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Thursday, September 18, 2008

Overstimulation Roundup

posted by on September 18 at 16:23 PM

Burnout Paradise (Xbox 360, PS3) — WAAAAAAAAAAHOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO

The year’s best “crash-to-win” racing game just got painfully better today. Like, “tear ass down a highway and launch into the most ridiculous motorcycle jump to win a race” better. See the above glee noise.

For whatever reason, EA is giving away a Burnout Paradise expansion rather than charging for it—see? The people behind Spore’s DRM ain’t so bad. Anyway. This pack adds motorcycles to the game’s original car/bus/four-wheel fleet; big whoop, right? Thing is, bike mode’s tiny tweaks double the gameplay in BP’s massive network of roads and highways. Welcome to turbo.

Less traffic to contend with. Higher acceleration. No need to build up nitro powers or crap to reach top speed. Even when you crash, your driving resumes more quickly than before. Every tweak big and small leads to less wait, more WAAAAAAA… People like to talk a lot about open-ended games, but BP’s aimless driving was already more thrilling than anything GTA IV served up. Now that the racer has added bikes, it’s officially the coolest virtual take on a Hot Wheels loop-de-loop in your living room—and there are still more expansions to come.

If you’ve got a jones for dirtbikes or ATVs, another new game this month, Pure, is pretty compelling as well. Its gameworld is nothing like BP’s city, but it has lots of hills and big-air jumps. Plus, you can do stunts… I think people still like stunts and X-Games shit, right?

Destructiogrouplg.jpg

Warhammer Online (PC) — Also seeing release today is an MMO with orcs, dwarves, elves, and knights. Sound familiar? There’s already World of Warcraft, and Lord of the Rings Online, and Everquest, and… did Age of Conan have any dwarves? Dunno, don’t care.

So why cough up another $15 a month to play with more people named “Khyghlar” and “Memnemnemnom”? Simply put, because you’ll actually play with them.

My MMO experience up to now is pretty minimal, and that’s because I don’t have a posse of people to quest with. Games like World of Warcraft start out light—lots of quests that don’t need a big team. There’s nothing “massively multiplayer” about killing a bunch of big-toothed pigs by yourself; you’re stuck with boring grinds for a while before you reach epic battlegrounds and dungeon raids. I typically lose my patience by then. (And I have other complaints.)

In only 10 hours of play during WO’s soft opening, I’ve already had tons to do with other people—and not just ignoring random “A/S/L” requests. Within minutes of a new quest, you’re forced into epic team games of king of the hill with immediate rewards (and auto-tweaks so that weak players have a chance, nice). There are also “public quests” in which a mega-sized nasty pops up in the middle of a road or field, and you and whoever else is nearby has to team up to take out the unexpected threat ASAP. As I soldier on, apparently my “side” of the game world will have to battle for control of towns; can’t remark on this yet, and I dunno if this’ll be fun or just a pain in the ass while I’m trying to save my game and quit out.

But so far, I love this emphasis on conflict. If I’m paying $15 a month to be online, it should feel that way, right? And other tweaks in the game go a long way to making WoW blush—clearly marked maps? Fewer times where you kill enemies over and over and over just to get one random, stupid item? A grouping system that makes it easy to team up with strangers? Less fucking running all over the place? Good. WO has made it a priority to not make you feel like an asshole for paying for their game.

Speaking of, there haven’t been issues with lag or server meltdowns; compared to WoW’s half-year of launch hell back in ‘04, that’s worth noting. But a few things are still missing here—for starters, art direction. WO has mostly bleak, grey environments, uncustomizable characters, and cookie-cutter monsters (with a few exceptions). Might get better later, but if the game brings my 2.2 Ghz PC to a crawl, even on the lowest settings, there should be a better reason. The dreary look should’ve died with Everquest, people.

And while the Warhammer tabletop series prides itself in making stories and writing a big part of its play, WO doesn’t. There’s a “Tome” of info and stories to flip through, but the few I’ve stopped to peruse haven’t been clear, witty, or helpful in the game, and I don’t want to stop and read while my online guy is about to get picked off by some dickhead elf.

It’s hard to dig much further than this, since I didn’t play for weeks in the beta or anything. Eurogamer did, and their complaints after weeks of play jive with what I’ve seen so far, but that opinion comes from someone who willingly got hooked onto WoW. I think this game is better suited for a halfway-hardcore stance—for people who know how WoW works but never fell for it.

Question is, is WO more than its mere WoW tweaks? Is there a great game here, or just great ideas that may better serve a future MMO concept that moves beyond the ancient “knights are strong, mages heal them” formula? I guess we’ll find out; I’ll keep tearing through WO and will post again in the next few weeks.

Castle Crashers (Xbox 360) — This TMNT Arcade-throwback came out weeks ago, and while I’m waiting for the online modes to be fixed before posting a review, I have to say, this game is the reason I haven’t written about much else lately. I cannot stop playing Castle Crashers. Whenever the game’s humorous cartoon style and addictive hack-and-slash play is out of my system, I’ll have enough time to talk about titles like the new Viva Pinata and the new Mercenaries.

RSS icon Comments

1

Mercs 2, while buggy as hell, is really fun with another player. Alone, it falls under the same trap as the first one: You'll do everything the game has in the first 3 hours.

Posted by harold | September 18, 2008 4:41 PM
2

Your teammates are named Leggolas, Legolaas, Xxlegolasxx, Lesgrolass, Legglas, and DrizzztGoku.

Posted by Smarth | September 18, 2008 6:43 PM
3

I've been so busy with Rock Band 2 and Viva Pinata: TiP that I'd forgotten about the bikes in BP. I had gotten pretty bored with it but I might have to drop it back in between taking the kids to soccer/pokemon.

Posted by Mike of Renton | September 18, 2008 8:32 PM
4

The world premiere of Blog Theatre. Please give a warm applause for this evenings production of George Washington.

Posted by PDL Presents | September 18, 2008 9:39 PM
5

We are taping this meeting for county record and counsel review. Do you have any objections to the filming of this deposition?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 9:41 PM
6

That would be just fine.

Posted by Earl Yeager | September 18, 2008 9:41 PM
7

Thank you. For the record, could you please state your full legal name and date of birth?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 9:42 PM
8


My name is Earl Joseph Yeager and I was born in Dane County Texas, the first day of June 1939.

Posted by Earl Yeager | September 18, 2008 9:42 PM
9


Could you please state your current place of residence?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 9:43 PM
10


At the present, I reside at 12 Mason County Highway.

Posted by Earl Yeager | September 18, 2008 9:44 PM
11

And this is the address of a corrections facility in Texas?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 9:44 PM
12

San Romero Medium Security. Federal Prison.

Posted by Earl Yeager | September 18, 2008 9:45 PM
13

For the record could you please state under what charges this incarceration was indicted?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 9:45 PM
14

Well sir that would be for seven counts of molestation of a minor. I believe thatís the term they used. And to save you the trouble, Iíve got three months down, 47 to go. Forty-seven months that is.

Posted by Earl Yeager | September 18, 2008 9:45 PM
15

Thank you sir. Could you please state your career prior to your current incarceration?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 9:46 PM
16


I was the Governor.

Posted by Earl Yeager | September 18, 2008 9:46 PM
17

This would be Governor of the state of Texas?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 9:47 PM
18

That would be correct. Three terms elected.

Posted by Earl Yeager | September 18, 2008 9:47 PM
19

And prior to your political life?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 9:47 PM
20


Iím a businessman, been so all my life.

Posted by Earl Yeager | September 18, 2008 9:48 PM
21

And what type of business would this be?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 9:48 PM
22

Oil. Me and my father before.

Posted by Earl Yeager | September 18, 2008 9:49 PM
23

And you remain the majority partner in Gulf Coast Oil?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 9:49 PM
24

That would be correct.

Posted by Earl Yeager | September 18, 2008 9:49 PM
25

Could you please explain your relationship to the deceased, one Mr. George Washington?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 9:50 PM
26

My relationship with George? Well sir, thatís a might big question.

Posted by Earl Yeager | September 18, 2008 9:50 PM
27

How about we call him George?

Posted by Earl Yeager | September 18, 2008 9:51 PM
28

How did you first meet the deceased?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 9:51 PM
29

How did you first meet the deceased?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 9:52 PM
30

This story is very well documented Mr. Morrison.

Posted by Earl Yeager | September 18, 2008 9:53 PM
31

Mr. Yeager, I understand that some of the questions may have readily available answers, but I am here to lead an investigation regarding the murder of what I understand to be a very close friend of yours. It is vital that I have your accounts, without assumption and without second party opinion.

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 9:54 PM
32

Very well. I met George in Yucca Valley, California on September 21, 1979. George was three. Iím a pilot, been flying since I was a kid. Got my start with crop dusters, but flew jets mostly. I had a couple whirlybirds at the time. Helicopters. Traveled quite a bit between Las Vegas, Houston and Los Angeles- on business and the like. I was flying a Hennings 1290. Loud as hell but a beautiful bird. So September 21st? I was flying low through the high Mohave, left Vegas in the morning. Mimi and Franks place was in the middle of nowhere, but thereís a lot of that between Vegas and L.A. Anyhow, they had a real shit hole of a place back then, little single wide mobile home.

Posted by Earl Yeager | September 18, 2008 9:54 PM
33

Iím sorry Mr. Yeager- that would be Mimi and Frank Washington? Georgeís parents?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 9:54 PM
34

Call me Earl. Yeah, that would be Georgeís parents. So I was flying low and spotted what George had made out there in the desert. That was something- course I didnít think George made it, seeing it from the air, but I was taken back and curious. I touched down a fair distance not to disrupt anything and walked over to where the boy was working. Hereís this kid in overalls, barefoot, out in the desert sun, just busy as a bee moving these little river rock around. Three years old. He wouldnít answer me, or even look up he was so damned intent. Well Mimi, she came out all hell bent wanting to know my business. Thinking I was from some city office or something. She didnít have a clue what was going on. Thatís about when I figured that George must have made it.

Posted by Earl Yeager | September 18, 2008 9:55 PM
35

Had made what?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 9:55 PM
36


Iím getting there partner, Iím telling you a story. (Pause) So I lit a smoke, thought about it a bit and eventually convinced Mimi to take a ride in my Hennings. Frank wasnít around, at work or some shit, and Iíll tell you, she did not want to go, me being a stranger aside. But I took the two of them up, three hundred feet, held her there. They looked down. George points to the desert floor and says, ďMommy.Ē Sure as shit, there it is, size of a fucking basketball court. George had made this portrait of Mimi- photo realistic, laughing, hair flowing back in the wind, with a long cigarette in her hand. A Kool- if I remember correctly. George made it outta rocks and brush and sticks. Swear to god it looked just like a photograph. Mimi started crying. She said that she thought George might have been retarded, or had something bad, the way he was acting. I told her no maím, your boy here is an artist. (Pause, smiling) That was some day!

Posted by Earl Yeager | September 18, 2008 9:56 PM
37

Our records state that you were the legal guardian of Mr. Washington from April of 1987 to November of 1994. Could you please explain the exact nature of your relationship with George?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 9:56 PM
38

That was after Frank and Mimi took buckshot in Rome, yeah, eighty-seven. Guess he was eleven at the time. Tough time. He lived with me in Fettersville. And Iíll save you the trouble Mr. Morrison- I never touched George inappropriately, ever. I was a father to that boy. And he was a son to me, always will be. I gave that boy nothing but good. Taught him to fly when he was twelve. Taught him how to have fun too- boy did we have fun.

Posted by Earl Yeager | September 18, 2008 9:57 PM
39

There is a rumor that the two of you walked on the surface of the moon.

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 9:57 PM
40

Some 50th birthday present? Yeah we did that. That was the NASA commission in 89í.

Posted by Earl Yeager | September 18, 2008 9:58 PM
41

As his legal guardian what type of rules, or discipline did you establish? From my limited understanding, it appeared like George could get away with just about anything.

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 9:58 PM
42

He was a special kid. I had my rules, but all the stories you heard, well, that came later. When I got him, he was used to working 6-7 days a week. The boy had no childhood. Heíd light up at the mention of fishing, or swimming, simple stuff. Never married so I never had no kids of my own, and well George was a bit different than kids his age. Really had no experience with kids his own age. Hell, I encouraged him to play, to have fun, but most the time heíd sit around drinking lemonade with my friends. But he learned how to have fun, and well, eventually, well, he got the hang of it. Pretty good Iíd say.

Posted by Earl Yeager | September 18, 2008 9:58 PM
43

Is it true that he moved in with you, at age twelve, with his twenty-five year old girlfriend?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 9:59 PM
44

Acacia? She was a nun fer godís sakes! First off. Iím here to cooperate Mr. Morrison, cause I was told one of your kind fellas would drive me out to Walden Three for a little field trip. And Iíll answer your questions, sure as shit. But I donít see how none of this is gonna bring George back. I donít see how who he screwed on my watch has anything to do with him being dead out in the desert.

Posted by Earl Yeager | September 18, 2008 9:59 PM
45

At what point were you aware of Georgeís problems with illegal drugs?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 10:00 PM
46

Mr. Morrison, we are not talking about a normal boy. We are taking about the greatest goddamned artist in the history of mankind. Ever. We are talking about a boy who didnít get a childhood like the rest of us, someone who witnessed the murder of his parents. When Frank and Mimi left us, George was worth 17 billion and some change. Money he earned. He has the voice of god in his fucking hands! The burden that boy carried. Yeah, I knew George was doing things. Not in my house you see, but after he left, out at TAB. George had his share of demons, and people turn to different things to keep emí gone. Sure he was doing drugs- and sleepin around and livin on the edge- till Patti came round.

Posted by Earl Yeager | September 18, 2008 10:01 PM
47

Patti Taylor?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 10:01 PM
48


Yeah, Patti Taylor. Now here was a real sweetheart. George probably would have been dead two years ago if he hadnít met Patti. They straightened each other out. He didnít even drink beer after they met. Cleaned up like a choir boy.

Posted by Earl Yeager | September 18, 2008 10:02 PM
49

The coronerís office found large traces of heroin in Georgeís blood.

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 10:02 PM
50

Where the fuck is Gordon Wood? Why donít you ask him what happened? Killing that poor girl just to get George all back on track. Nobody wanted to see George being happy. Cept fer me and Claire, Patti, Alex- maybe a few others. Happy George couldnít paint, didnít need to. Gordon Wood- where the fuck is that little shit fry!

Posted by Earl Yeager | September 18, 2008 10:03 PM
51

Patti Taylor also had a large quantity of heroin and speed in her system at time of death. The coronerís office found no foul play. What makes you so sure that the two of them straightened up?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 10:03 PM
52

Fuck the coronerís office. Mr. Morrison, no offense, but you donít know what the hell you are dealing with. Your records. One word- bullshit. You are getting fed crap because thatís what they want you to eat. Patti and George were inseparable- they saved each other. Two pieces of a puzzle. And they were clean- I know that. They had so much goddamn love for each other, youíd just cry happiness being around them. And that is the truth. I donít know what your file says but Patti didnít overdose, not by her own hand. She was taken out. Killed professionally.

Posted by Earl Yeager | September 18, 2008 10:04 PM
53

You believe that Patti was murdered?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 10:05 PM
54

Of course she was. When George met Patti, he stopped painting. He found something that plugged up all his holes. He met Patti and didnít want drugs, didnít want other women, and didnít want to paint. Or couldnít paint. Certainly the world wouldnít bless them together. Patti was killed. Killed so that George would go back to painting. And it worked. Worked like a charm.

Posted by Earl Yeager | September 18, 2008 10:06 PM
55

It worked once. The Walden Three mural was the only project he worked on.

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 10:07 PM
56


It only had to work once! Some goddamn coincidence! Gordon Wood must be one lucky feller- if youíre a fool to believe. Heíd been trying to get George to paint that damned entrance for six years. Tell you the truth I donít know why George finally gave in to that rat. Figure I will when I see it.

Posted by Earl Yeager | September 18, 2008 10:07 PM
57

The dev team behind Pure has been making the same style of ATV trick/racing games for a few dev cycles/generations. In the past they included stuff like punching and kicking. I think the disney influence has forced them to focus on the core racing/tricks. It seems to have been for the best. Did you get deep into the released product? Let me know how the simplified trick system works in the end game.

For me castle crashers and too human are the same game. Pick your player flavor and start running and gunning with your buddy. The girlfriend loves the art direction of CC (especially the pets) and I'm down with fun co-op. It's not too long and definitely more the merrier.

I'm just past the first level on too human (just got to the city). The game's control/design elements are frustrating on many many levels, but I'm sure I'll play through it a few times to try it all out because I'm a sucker for these style of games.

Hit me up on live for some co-op: drawed

Posted by drew | September 18, 2008 10:07 PM
58

Do you remember the last time you saw George?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 10:09 PM
59

Yes sir. March18, last year. I flew out to TAB.

Posted by Earl Yeager | September 18, 2008 10:10 PM
60

TAB?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 10:10 PM
61

Talisand Airforce Base, where they lived.

Posted by Earl Yeager | September 18, 2008 10:10 PM
62


And can you describe the nature of your visit?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 10:11 PM
63

The matter before me now. I was being blackmailed. Certain information was going to be made public. I was told in no uncertain terms that if I could convince George to paint Walden Three, this information would be suppressed. If I couldnít, well, Iíd get a new wardrobe. Guess you can tell how that visit went.

Posted by Earl Yeager | September 18, 2008 10:11 PM
64

You flew there to try and convince George to paint Walden Three?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 10:12 PM
65

Bingo Mr. Morrison, Walden Three- city of the goddamn future. So you could say I was looking for a favor. This was two weeks before Patti died. I was in a hard place. Flew my old Delta Skyhawk out there. Mind you Iíve never asked George for nothing at all. But on this day, I needed him bad. I remember he was all dressed in white like John Lennon, Patti just walked around in drawstring pants, white, but no top. Great tits that girl. The place was like the garden of Eden. All the animals they had running around there- giraffes, monkeys, llamas. Everybody was healthy. Alex wasnít, but Alex never was. I had so much shit going down in Austin, but I walked in there and just cried. Mind you, a joyful cry. I was real happy for them. I told George what I was up against, asked him to just paint one for the old man. Just one favor. But George looked at me square in the eye and said no. Not cause he didnít want to help me. I know he would have if he could. Not one to judge, that boy. He offered me money, he offered me anything but a painting. I understood. It was like trying to squeeze water from a rock, it just wasnít in him. We had a glass of lemonade and said goodbye. I knew I wasnít gonna see him for awhile, he knew the same. I resigned as Governor the following day, March 23rd. Story broke that Friday.

Posted by Earl Yeager | September 18, 2008 10:12 PM
66

So George could have saved you from going to prison, from stepping down from Governor? He could have saved you, but he didnít. How did that make you feel?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 10:13 PM
67

George Washington changed the face of humanity by the time he was ten years old. Fuck you! The kid stopped wars Mr. Morrison. How did it make me feel? Ashamed Mr. Morrison, utterly ashamed of myself.

Posted by Earl Yeager | September 18, 2008 10:13 PM
68

I am sorry Mr. Yeager, but he turned his back to you only to accept the commission just a month later? What made George change his mind?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 10:14 PM
69

You should start asking some intelligent questions mister prosecutor. What changed his mind? Patti was murdered not ten days after I left. All the plugs were pulled. Iím surprised he didnít stick a barrel in his mouth right then and there. Instead he went back to his old ways- dope and paint, thatís all he knew how to do.

Posted by Earl Yeager | September 18, 2008 10:14 PM
70

My notes indicate that representatives of Mr. Gordon Wood attempted on numerous occasions to meet with George about Walden Three. Even with Patti dead, George could have painted anything. Why go to Walden Three, after rejecting it numerous times?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 10:15 PM
71

That I donít know. George never painted nothing for nobody unless they had something he wanted. Comprende? He painted Walden Three because he found something that he actually wanted from Gordon Wood. For once. Gordon Wood, richest man in the world, yeah, all the power he can handle. But George never wanted his money, didnít need it. Gordon didnít have anything George wanted. After Patti died, George wanted something from him. Thatís why it was painted. George asked him. Two days after the funeral. Now what did George want? Now there is a good question. What did George finally see? What did he want from that scumbag?

Posted by Earl Yeager | September 18, 2008 10:15 PM
72

Mr. Yeager, do you know what the terms of the painting were?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 10:15 PM
73

No. No I do not. Figure I will when I see Walden Three. I know what it wasnít for. It wasnít for money. George hasnít painted for money since Rome. Did you talk with Claire? She did all his negotiating. She is the negotiator in the family. That girl has had laws changed. Claire may appear like a sweet innocent but she could command the assassination of a president, or negotiate a walk on the moon for a Washington mural.

Posted by Earl Yeager | September 18, 2008 10:16 PM
74

I have not spoken to Claire yet. Mr. Yeager, prison records indicate that you were in constant communication with George. Is it true that during your incarceration, you spoke with George on a daily basis?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 10:17 PM
75

Mr. Morrison, we both know that prison records donít show anything of the like. Now if you were to ask me if George and I were talking with one another, now there is a question, but I know what records show and what they donít show. Yeah, we talked Mr. Morrison.

Posted by Earl Yeager | September 18, 2008 10:18 PM
76

Mr. Yeager, did George voice any concern about his safety? Did he feel like his life was in jeopardy?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 10:18 PM
77

Ha! Well hell yes his life was in jeopardy, you talk to Jerry Mack about that. But George wasnít worried about dying, especially after Patti left us. He told me he was gonna paint Walden Three. At her service. I got the sense he was saying goodbye in a way. I suspected that much. You see it donít really matter what the terms were, Mr. Morrison, they were Georgeís. Have you seen it Mr. Morrison?

Posted by Earl Yeager | September 18, 2008 10:18 PM
78

Walden Three? No I have not.

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 10:19 PM
79

I need to see it. I need to see Walden Three. I was told that if I cooperated one of your fellas would drive me out.

Posted by Earl Yeager | September 18, 2008 10:19 PM
80

I am not aware of those arrangements, Mr. Yeager. What I am hearing from you is that George had lost a certain desire to live after losing Ms. Taylor. Understood. But the conditions of Georgeís death do not indicate or even suggest suicide as a viable option. There was a second party involved in his death.

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 10:20 PM
81

I am aware that it would be difficult to burry yourself up to the neck in sand and cut your own head off with surgical precision.

Posted by Earl Yeager | September 18, 2008 10:20 PM
82

Who had the motive?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 10:21 PM
83

Oh it is a long list Mr. Morrison. The Saudiís, the Roman Catholic church, Hamas, Al Qaeda, a dozen private parties, hell the CIA. Lots of people have motive, but George had the best motive. If he is dead, itís because George wanted to die.

Posted by Earl Yeager | September 18, 2008 10:21 PM
84

You said if. Are you not convinced George is dead?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 10:21 PM
85

No, no, of course he is, right? You found the body. Iím just saying I donít think George wanted to live. Iím just surprised by the way he went. You find his head?

Posted by Earl Yeager | September 18, 2008 10:22 PM
86

No. Not at present. Iíd like to get back to Gordon Wood. What do you know about Mr. Wood?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 10:23 PM
87

I know he would have gutted his grandparents for George to paint Walden Three. And my guess is that heís got blood on his hands, direct or indirectly. But men like Mr. Wood donít go to jail. We both know that. Doesnít matter much where you point yer finger, he ainít coming back. No sir. From the way the papers read, sounds like you should be concerned with all this suicide business. Whatís the number at?

Posted by Earl Yeager | September 18, 2008 10:23 PM
88

I donít know.

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 10:24 PM
89

You donít know bug shit Mr. Morrison.

Posted by Earl Yeager | September 18, 2008 10:24 PM
90

My position is to investigate a homicide Mr. Yeager. Now I may not know very much about Mr. Washington, but I am going to, I am going to learn everything there is to know about him. And I do believe that if justice can be served we can buffer the shock and remorse of his followers.

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 10:24 PM
91

Whatís the number at Mr. Morrison?

Posted by Earl Yeager | September 18, 2008 10:25 PM
92

Two hundred and seventy five thousand, roughly.

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 10:26 PM
93

Thatís a whole lot of folks. None of them seen Walden Three, had they?

Posted by Earl Yeager | September 18, 2008 10:26 PM
94

That is another matter entirely. My purpose is to bring light to the situation and circumstances around Mr. Washingtonís death.

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 10:27 PM
95

How is it that a man like you, educated, city man, donít know shit about George. How is that? Youíve never seen a painting of his, have you?

Posted by Earl Yeager | September 18, 2008 10:27 PM
96

Iíve seen pictures. But no, not in person, no I have not. Iím from Alaska.

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 10:27 PM
97

There is one in Anchorage, down at the harbor.

Posted by Earl Yeager | September 18, 2008 10:28 PM
98

It always seemed like a tourist trap.

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 10:29 PM
99

Well golly, maybe there is a reason twelve million people visit it a year.

Posted by Earl Yeager | September 18, 2008 10:29 PM
100

Honestly Mr. Yeager, I think I was given this case from my lack of experience with the deceased. I think I can bring some objectivity to the events surrounding Mr. Washingtonís death.

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 10:30 PM
101

Well then, all the luck to you.

Posted by Earl Yeager | September 18, 2008 10:31 PM
102

Thank you for your time Mr. Yeager. I would like to keep you in Los Angeles for a few days, in case I have additional questions.

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 10:32 PM
103

I want to see Walden Three goddamn it! No photographs!

Posted by Earl Yeager | September 18, 2008 10:32 PM
104

I will talk to the Sheriffs office.

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 10:33 PM
105

Talk to John Mayer. (pause) Iíd be mighty appreciative. Iím too old to run or cause any funny business, I just need to see it. I need to see it awfully bad.

Posted by Earl Yeager | September 18, 2008 10:33 PM
106

Why is that Mr. Yeager?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 10:34 PM
107

Selfish reasons Mr. Morrison. Afraid if I donít see it, I might just find myself hanging from a bed sheet. See, I need to understand it, just like the rest.

Posted by Earl Yeager | September 18, 2008 10:34 PM
108

I will talk to the Sheriffs office. Thank you for your time Mr. Yeager.

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 10:35 PM
109

Call me Earl.

Posted by Earl Yeager | September 18, 2008 10:35 PM
110

Thank you for coming on such short notice. I hope you can appreciate the urgency of the matters at hand. We are taping this meeting for county record and counsel review. Do you have any objections to the filming of this deposition?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 10:36 PM
111

Actually I kind of do. No offense man, but Iím a private person.

Posted by Alex Wu | September 18, 2008 10:37 PM
112

I promise you Mr. Wu that this deposition will be held with the greatest sensitivity and privacy. It exists only for the use of my staff and counsel review.

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 10:38 PM
113

Maybe you could do one of those shadow things, where you only see my silhouette?

Posted by Alex Wu | September 18, 2008 10:39 PM
114

Mr. Wu, may I ask exactly who you are afraid of seeing this interview?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 10:39 PM
115

Iím not afraid, shit. Iím a private person and my bro just gets whacked. And I donít trust any of you.

Posted by Alex Wu | September 18, 2008 10:40 PM
116

You donít trust any of you what?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 10:40 PM
117

Anyone, you. Making promises you canít keep. Thereís a half dozen people who could get their hands on this interview with a single phone call. Maybe youíd know about it, maybe not, but I know. I know what power is, and you canít promise me shit. Fuck it. Let the camera roll. I ainít afraid. Got my own business to tend to.

Posted by Alex Wu | September 18, 2008 10:41 PM
118

Thank you Mr. Wu. For the record, could you please state your full legal name and date of birth?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 10:42 PM
119

My name is Alex Wu. November 24, 1973. I donít know the hospital, but born in the valley- San Fernando Valley.

Posted by Alex Wu | September 18, 2008 10:42 PM
120

Could you please state your current place of residence?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 10:43 PM
121

TAB.

Posted by Alex Wu | September 18, 2008 10:43 PM
122

This would be Talisand Air Force Base?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 10:44 PM
123

Yeah.

Posted by Alex Wu | September 18, 2008 10:44 PM
124

And you shared this residence with George Washington?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 10:44 PM
125

Yeah, me and Claire and George. My family. Lived there since I was 22.

Posted by Alex Wu | September 18, 2008 10:45 PM
126

And could you please state your occupation.

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 10:46 PM
127

Man, I was his brother. I was his Chinese brother.

Posted by Alex Wu | September 18, 2008 10:46 PM
128

It was my understanding that Mr. Washington employed you.

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 10:47 PM
129

I did everything. Personal bodyguard, pilot, driver, public liaison, butler. Man I did whatever. Officially, guess you could say I was his bodyguard.

Posted by Alex Wu | September 18, 2008 10:47 PM
130

How did you make Mr. Washingtonís acquaintance?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 10:48 PM
131

We grew up together in Yucca. My dad had the place next to Georgeís parents.

Posted by Alex Wu | September 18, 2008 10:48 PM
132

And youíve been close to him since childhood?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 10:48 PM
133

Man, I used to change his diapers. Iím three years older than George, but out in the desert, we were the only kids around. When Earl showed up, the Washingtonís got out of Dodge quick. They even left their furniture behind.

Posted by Alex Wu | September 18, 2008 10:49 PM
134

When Earl Yeager discovered George? What happened?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 10:49 PM
135

Man are you serious? Why you gotta ask stupid questions? Why donít you ask me who whacked my bro?

Posted by a | September 18, 2008 10:50 PM
136

You must understand that we share the same objectives Mr. Wu. It is critical that I document your story, in your words. I apologize if these questions soundÖ simple.

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 10:51 PM
137

Whatever.

Posted by Alex Wu | September 18, 2008 10:51 PM
138

What happened after Mr. Yeager showed up?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 10:52 PM
139

Bam, they were outta there. And they were the only neighbors we had, it was just my dad, and his folks. Earl took them to Houston, to get George all formal and shit.

Posted by Alex Wu | September 18, 2008 10:53 PM
140

He took the whole Washington family to his estate in Houston?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 10:53 PM
141

You could bet I wanted to be on that flight. Earl had a bright orange Hennings 620- one of those choppers that Magnum P-Iís bro had. Same one. They just flew off.

Posted by Alex Wu | September 18, 2008 10:54 PM
142

When was the next time you saw George?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 10:54 PM
143

On T.V. man! Maybe six months after he left Yucca. Every fucking station. Geraldo, 60 Minutes, Real People, all of them.

Posted by Alex Wu | September 18, 2008 10:55 PM
144

And in person? When was the next time you saw George in person?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 10:55 PM
145

When I was twenty. I got in some trouble. I wasnít flying all over the world, hanging out with kings and shit. I was in Riverside, dealing, you know, getting into trouble.

Posted by Alex Wu | September 18, 2008 10:55 PM
146

When did you reacquaint with George?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 10:56 PM
147

Some stupid shit meth head brought me in on this bad deal. He was wired. Three strikes and I was out. You know what I mean? I was looking at life. Serious. Iím in my orange jumper, all feeling sorry for myself. I was in San Quinton. Warden comes down, walks me out to the bus. Heís looking all pissed off, face all serious and shit. He hands me car keys, an envelope. He sayís, ďI donít know why anyone would give a shit about you, but youíve got some friends. Some real serious friends.Ē And he told me to beat it. There was a black Maserati- 360 S, on the other side of the bus and the keys fit. I didnít ask any questions. In the glove box was fifty large.

Posted by Alex Wu | September 18, 2008 10:56 PM
148

I donít understand Mr. Wu. Your record is clean. Your record shows no prior convictions, not even a speeding ticket.

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 10:57 PM
149

Have a friend like George and he can fix things like that. Inside the envelope was a ticket to the Lakers game, that night. There was a note from George. It just said Iíd better be there.

Posted by Alex Wu | September 18, 2008 10:57 PM
150

Are you suggesting that George Washington negotiated your release from federal prison and wiped your record clean?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 10:58 PM
151

Power of the brush. He made a painting for it. You know the Staples Center mural? Yeah. Just part of the trade. George traded for favors, all sorts of favors.

Posted by Alex Wu | September 18, 2008 10:58 PM
152

Like walking on the moon?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 10:59 PM
153

Like shit you wouldnít believe.

Posted by Alex Wu | September 18, 2008 10:59 PM
154

Was he there?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 11:00 PM
155

I bought an Armani suit, picked up a little bling. Yeah I went to the game. He saved my life. I hadnít seen George since I was six years old. Here I thought he was just off jet setting, but he was looking out for me. My bro. So, I was feeling all fresh, got my new suit on, then I walk into Staples and see this painting George made. I shit myself right there. No kidding. New suit, all these people around, and you know what, I didnít even care. I wasnít the only one. There was a whole pack of janitors cleaning the floor up. That mural changed my life, right then and there. So I cleaned my shorts and walked down to my courtside seat, thinking Iíd see George there, sitting next to me.

Posted by Alex Wu | September 18, 2008 11:00 PM
156

Where were you the day George disappeared?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 11:01 PM
157

Yeah he was there, but not sitting next to me- he was on the court! And George ainít a big guy. So this five foot eight white guy is out there with the giants. And he sucked, bad. It was beautiful. After the game, we went back to TAB and I never looked back. I owe him my life. So I was there for him, always.

Posted by Alex Wu | September 18, 2008 11:02 PM
158

Home being TAB?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 11:02 PM
159

(pause)

I was at home.

Posted by Alex Wu | September 18, 2008 11:03 PM
160

Did you know if he left alone? Where he was going?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 11:04 PM
161

No.

Posted by a | September 18, 2008 11:05 PM
162

I thought you were his bodyguard.

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 11:05 PM
163

Man, fuck you. Fuck you.

Posted by Alex Wu | September 18, 2008 11:06 PM
164

I apologize, I didnít mean it like that. Was it common for George to leave without telling anyone?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 11:06 PM
165

Man you are an asshole. He is my best friend and yeah I was his bodyguard. But a guy canít watch a guy twenty-four seven. I saved his ass plenty of times, but I couldnít be everywhere. (pause)
Man, George painted alone, in private. Iíd have scaffold set up and surround the joint in black curtains. No one went in when he worked. Nobody. Not me, not Claire, nobody. My job was to make sure that happened, I was security. George would stay in that space for weeks. Maybe come out for a smoke, but he is so fucking serious when he works. So we were out at Walden Three. Just like all the other times. Hell, I was glad to see him back painting. Anything to get his mind off Patti. So I sat outside that arch all day, all night. That was my job. Had this tricked out little Winnebago. Three weeks I was out there, day and night. When George finished, we split the scene. Drove back to TAB and got fuckin high. Yeah, I was high when George split. Playing video games or some shit. He must have just drove off. The silver Austin Martin was gone.

Posted by Alex Wu | September 18, 2008 11:06 PM
166

Did George say where he was going? Leave a note?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 11:07 PM
167

No, but me and Claire figured he was going to Lewisís.

Posted by Alex Wu | September 18, 2008 11:07 PM
168

Dr. Lewis Klemtropher?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 11:08 PM
169

Yeah. Lewis is Georgeís doctor.

Posted by Alex Wu | September 18, 2008 11:08 PM
170

And his drug dealer?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 11:09 PM
171

Sure, why not, yeah. But he didnít make it to L.A. He never called Lewis even.

Posted by Alex Wu | September 18, 2008 11:09 PM
172

How do you know?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 11:10 PM
173

Because I called Lewis and Lewis is stand-up.

Posted by Alex Wu | September 18, 2008 11:10 PM
174

Do you recall what the date was? The day he left TAB?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 11:11 PM
175

The second. Thatís the last time I saw him without his head sawed in half. Is that what you mean?

Posted by Alex Wu | September 18, 2008 11:11 PM
176

I didnít know you identified the body.

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 11:11 PM
177

Yeah, me and Claire both. Not like anyone else could identify him like that. Missing his head and shit. Donít matter none anyway, nobody knew what he looked like anyhow.

Posted by Alex Wu | September 18, 2008 11:12 PM
178

Why is that?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 11:12 PM
179

You have your parents whacked when you are eleven and worth bank. You be the guy that good people will do bad things for. No photographs, no dental records, no fingerprints. Thatís the way it was. That was the way it had to be.

Posted by Alex Wu | September 18, 2008 11:13 PM
180

But he was on national television? Playing basketball?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 11:13 PM
181

No one knew it was George. Plus he was wearing an afro. If no one knows what you look like, well, no one knows what you look like, right? But that was a long time ago. What are we doing talking about the past? I wanna talk about what you dudes are gonna do now.

Posted by Alex Wu | September 18, 2008 11:14 PM
182

Weíll get back to July 2rd. George left alone in the Austin Martin. If not Dr. Klemtropherís office, did you have any other ideas where George might have gone? The store? A meeting? To visit a friend?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 11:14 PM
183

No and no. He went to see Gordon Wood. Claire and me are sure of it.

Posted by Alex Wu | September 18, 2008 11:14 PM
184

Why are you so sure?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 11:15 PM
185

'Cause. They had business. George finished painting, Gordon owed him.

Posted by Alex Wu | September 18, 2008 11:15 PM
186

What did Gordon Wood owe him?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 11:16 PM
187

The trade. Whatever the trade was. George doesnít paint for money but he doesnít paint for free neither. He went to see Gordon, and never came back. Thatís the way I see it.

Posted by Alex Wu | September 18, 2008 11:16 PM
188

Do you know what the terms of the trade were?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 11:17 PM
189

No. Neither does Claire. George made the negotiation himself.

Posted by Alex Wu | September 18, 2008 11:17 PM
190

Why would Gordon Wood want George killed?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 11:18 PM
191

You see the way George fucked up his shit? Look man, do your homework. Gordon Wood has been swarming us for years. He had his Walden Three and was obsessed with George painting the entrance. So is it a coincidence that the day after George finishes Walden Three heís gone. You know what George painted. I think Gordon snuck a peek at the mural, saw what George had done and had him whacked. Thatís what happened.

Posted by Alex Wu | September 18, 2008 11:19 PM
192

Because Walden Three was destroyed? You think Gordon Wood blamed George for its failure?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 11:20 PM
193

Are you fucking kidding me? It was a fucking revolution man. He turned that joint on itís head- game over. George did what George needed to do, and it cost Gordon Wood what, forty billion. He mocked his shit. Of course that white turd had him whacked.

Posted by Alex Wu | September 18, 2008 11:21 PM
194

Wouldnít George want his bodyguard if he were going to meet a man whose project he just sabotaged? Wouldnít he want you there?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 11:21 PM
195

He wasnít thinking straight. When he finished a project, heíd freak out for a couple of days. You know, like a decompression thing. He would get high and heal. Painting drained his spirit. And whoís kidding, after Patti died, part of George was gone. He should have been home relaxing, drinking his health drinks. But he had some business that couldnít wait. Thatís how I see it.

Posted by Alex Wu | September 18, 2008 11:22 PM
196

You insinuated that George was in constant danger. Are there other parties that would want him dead?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 11:22 PM
197

George was in danger of being kidnapped, yeah. But no one wanted him dead. Canít paint so well when youíre dead.

Posted by Alex Wu | September 18, 2008 11:23 PM
198

You were as close to George as anyone. Besides Gordon Wood, is there anyone else, any individuals or groups that would have a motive for his death.

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 11:23 PM
199

George.

Posted by Alex Wu | September 18, 2008 11:24 PM
200

George?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 11:24 PM
201

Yeah, George. He didnít want to live. If it was a bullet in his head, Iíd say George sucked on a barrel. But kinda hard to cut off your own fucking head, as I see it. You need to look at who got fucked before George. Thatís how the dots are connected. You think Patti Taylor just checked into some cheap ass motel and overdosed? Bullshit. She was whacked. She was whacked because alive, George couldnít paint. My bro was in love, big time in love. He retired. There were a million people who wanted to see her go away, but no one so much as Gordon. They even tried to blackmail Earl, but George couldnít even paint for him. Look into who killed Patti, look into who set up Earl, and youíve found who killed George. And Iím telling you, Gordon Woodís name will light up like a fuckin Christmas tree.

Posted by Alex Wu | September 18, 2008 11:25 PM
202

I wanted him dead.

Posted by Billy the Cid | September 18, 2008 11:25 PM
203

I will be examining those events. Thank you. One last thing, can you tell me more about the air force base. I understand that you and George were both very active pilots. What type of planes did you fly?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 11:25 PM
204

All sorts. It was an air force base. We have seventy-five birds. Four choppers. All sorts. F-16ís, B-52ís, H-205, a Bell XS-1 an X-15. A Gloster, a Tomcat. Russian, Chinese, Experimental, all sorts.

Posted by Alex Wu | September 18, 2008 11:26 PM
205

Did anything strange ever happen out at TAB? Did you ever seen anything you couldnít explain?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 11:26 PM
206

All the fuckin time. But I know what youíre asking. Did I ever see any aliens, UFOís, that sort of thing. Yeah. Yeah, we did.

Posted by Alex Wu | September 18, 2008 11:26 PM
207

I didnít say aliens. I just meant anything out of the ordinary.

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 11:27 PM
208

I know what you meant.

Posted by Alex Wu | September 18, 2008 11:28 PM
209

Would it be alright if I called on you again, if I have more questions?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 11:29 PM
210

Iím not going anywhere Mister. Iím gonna stick around and see what you do. If you donít do your job, I will. I owe George that much. If it wasnít for Claire, I already would have clipped him.

Posted by Alex Wu | September 18, 2008 11:29 PM
211

Mr. Wu, please let us do our job. I promise you that justice will be served.

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 11:29 PM
212

Mr. Morrison, I can guarantee you that justice will be served.

Posted by Alex Wu | September 18, 2008 11:30 PM
213

*****************Begins ********************

Posted by Act III | September 18, 2008 11:32 PM
214

We are taping these depositions for county records and counsel review. Do you have any objections to the filming of this meeting?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 11:32 PM
215

Anything I can do to help.


Posted by Cynthia Brown | September 18, 2008 11:33 PM
216

Thank you. For the record, could you please state your full legal name and date of birth?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 11:34 PM
217


My name is Cynthia Denise Brown. I was born in Greenberg, Connecticut. My birth date is August 11, 1960.

Posted by Cynthia Brown | September 18, 2008 11:34 PM
218

Could you please state your place of residence?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 11:35 PM
219

122 Montana Avenue, Santa Monica, California, 90240.

Posted by Cynthia Brown | September 18, 2008 11:36 PM
220

And your occupation?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 11:37 PM
221

Deputy director of contemporary studies, at the J. Paul Getty Museum of the Arts.

Posted by Cynthia Brown | September 18, 2008 11:37 PM
222

Under this title, could you please describe the focus of your work?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 11:38 PM
223

I lead a team of historians that study the effects of contemporary art on social, religious and political systems.

Posted by Cynthia Brown | September 18, 2008 11:38 PM
224

You are recognized as the premiere art historian and biographer of George Washington. Is this correct?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 11:39 PM
225

I donít know if Ďpremiereí is the right word, but yes, I am a field expert on his work.

Posted by Cynthia Brown | September 18, 2008 11:39 PM
226

My notes say that you have authored numerous articles and six publications about Mr. Washington.

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 11:40 PM
227

That is correct.

Posted by Cynthia Brown | September 18, 2008 11:40 PM
228

You are going to have to forgive me Ms. Brown, as I do not have any formal art history training, and indeed know very little about George Washington as an artist. It is becoming increasingly clear that Mr. Washington lead a very unique life and that in order for me to understand the circumstances surrounding his death, I must gain a more comprehensive picture of who Mr. Washington was, how he worked and how he lived. I am hoping that you may shed some light into these matters.

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 11:41 PM
229

I am glad to assist you in any way I can.

Posted by Cynthia Brown | September 18, 2008 11:41 PM
230

In the last week I have heard in the media, and from my colleagues, that George Washington was the greatest painter in the world. Now I donít know if this is sensationalism, or a glorified respect for the recently deceased, but in your professional opinion, where exactly does George Washington fall in the hierarchy of art history?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 11:42 PM
231

Wow, I guess you do have some catching up to do Mr. Morrison. George Washington is the greatest painter of our civilization, perhaps of all mankind. There is no record or trace of an artist in the history of mankind that comes close to his technical capacity or visual impact. Your colleagues are not embellishing.

Posted by Cynthia Brown | September 18, 2008 11:42 PM
232

Hey Cynthia, you must know my pal Irena, in conservation! Give her my love.

Posted by mike | September 18, 2008 11:43 PM
233

I am afraid many of my questions may come across as naÔve or simple to you Ms. Brown. Please bear with me. I have to ask, what the significance is of George Washington sharing the same name of our countryís first president?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 11:43 PM
234

No, I donít find that a simple question. A month ago, it would be an easier question to answer. The easy version is that George Washington was born on July 10th, 1976, the year of the bicentennial. Georgeís parents must have been feeling rather patriotic at the time, as much of our country was. An interesting aspect of George sharing the same name as our first president is that if you travel abroad, say to India or Brazil- it really doesnít matter what country really- and ask people who George Washington is, they will all tell you that he is the great painter of America. Not the first president. Not the face on the one dollar bill. This 29-year old man from Southern California has garnered a greater name recognition than the man he was named in honor of. I find that fascinating.

Posted by Cynthia Brown | September 18, 2008 11:43 PM
235

What is the more difficult version?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 11:44 PM
236

Well, I find it odd that he completed the Walden Three mural on July 1st, died on July second or third and Gordon Wood inaugurated the mural on the forth of July. The fact that 200,000 people rioted in Walden Three on the forth of July could be associated to early American history, the Boston tea Party, the American Revolution, certainly of which George Washington the president is associated with. There is still so much information coming in right now it is hard to see what is relevant and irrelevant information. What indeed is coincidence and what is not. If indeed he was murdered, and it looks like he was, then I would say the killers probably didnít care what day of the week it was. But it is an awfully strange coincidence that George Washington would pave the way for a mass riot on the fourth of July. Do you have a lead?

Posted by Cynthia Brown | September 18, 2008 11:44 PM
237

So far it could be any number of countries, billionaires, religious fanatics, aliens, anyone really.

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 11:45 PM
238

Are aliens really on your list?

Posted by Cynthia Brown | September 18, 2008 11:45 PM
239

No, no, of course not. But I have been curious about this whole name thing, the forth of July, what happened at Walden Three. Were you there?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 11:46 PM
240

At Walden Three, well of course. I wouldnít have missed it for the world.

Posted by Cynthia Brown | September 18, 2008 11:46 PM
241

In your opinion, was the mural really responsible for the riot?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 11:47 PM
242

Yes it was. I think that half of the audience was interested in viewing the mural, the other half probably held some interest in the city, but when Gordon Wood finished his speech and unveiled the entrance to the city, there was absolute silence. Of course the crowd surged forward, but once underneath the arch, you could have heard a pin drop. Everyone just stood there, head cocked back and eyes wide open. Nobody moved. Two minutes must have past. I donít think anyone lost control of their bowels or spasmed on the ground. It wasnít that kind of feeling. It wasnítÖ uncontrolled. We all looked at it and knew exactly what to do. IT possessed that kind of clarity. His past works were so overwhelming it was like getting struck by lightening. This was more refined, it was instructional. It made perfect sense. And thatís the first thing I heard someone yell. ďIt makes perfect sense!Ē It wasnít really a riot. Not the way we think of riots, with people tripping over each other, there was no chaos. We worked as a team. Very calmly, the crowd walked into Walden Three, the city of the future, and systematically ripped out every computer screen, every wire from the wall, every door sensor, every camera. Two hundred thousand people and no one was hurt. Even the security there, the police, participated in the destruction. When everything was properly uprooted, the crowd quietly and politely left. Everyone had smiles on their faces. I went home and immediately proceeded to roundup my laptop, cell phone and blackberry, put them all in a black trash bag and placed them in the back seat of my car. The next day I drove back to Walden Three and viewed the mural again. I dumped my electronics in the courtyard and went home. It was a very lucid feeling. It felt natural. You really need to see the mural Mr. Morrison. It is so incrediblyÖ precise. That is the only word I can use to describe it. Precise. Exact language.

Posted by Cynthia Brown | September 18, 2008 11:47 PM
243

I do have plans to view the mural, but I would like to back up a step. Back to the beginning. Could you please describe how you first came in contact with Mr. Washington?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 11:48 PM
244

Of course. It was 1983. I was attending UCLA, in the MFA program. At the time I fancied myself as something of a painter. My instructor, Archie Freland heard about George first. He said there was a child prodigy in Houston that was exhibiting at the MOCA. He was seven years old. I scoffed at first- maybe a little jealous, but Archie was taking a group to see the exhibit and I went along.

Posted by Cynthia Brown | September 18, 2008 11:48 PM
245

And what was your reaction?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 11:48 PM
246

Physiologically- my period came two weeks early, as soon as I made eye contact with his work. My pants were covered in blood. There was a janitor there, his only job was cleaning up the urine and vomit from the floor. Viewers lost control of their bowels, they masturbated openly, cried and laughed, kissed strangers, screamed at the top of their lungs. It was incredible. MOCA was forced to close the exhibit after two days.

Posted by Cynthia Brown | September 18, 2008 11:49 PM
247

Oh, it's taped! Hm, is there a fast forward? I am surely not alone in my thinking.

Well, carry on! No drinking 'til curtain, kids. God help ya.

Posted by mike | September 18, 2008 11:49 PM
248

And your emotional response?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 11:49 PM
249

Oh boy! Have you ever tried heroin Mr. Morrison?

Posted by Cynthia Brown | September 18, 2008 11:50 PM
250

Do you honestly believe that?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 11:51 PM
251

Well then it is harder to describe. But imagine viewing the world with a clarity that you have never seen before, and seeing the positive, seeing hope for humanity, finding peace and tranquility. Understanding. It was a sensation greater than love, greater than pleasure. It was life changing and highly addictive Mr. Morrison. There are some private matters that I do not care to go into detail about, but witnessing the exhibition changed me completely. I never painted another canvas after that day. It was quite clear that things would never be the same. I would study him and learn all there was to know about him. In terms of cultural impact, he very well could be the most important person in the history of mankind, and we are in living in the eye of the storm. His legacy is just beginning. I am not a very religious person mind you, but living in the era of George Washington is similar to living in Jerusalem during the time of Christ.

Posted by Cynthia Brown | September 18, 2008 11:51 PM
252

Do you honestly believe that?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 11:53 PM
253

Did you read this morningís newspaper?

Posted by Cynthia Brown | September 18, 2008 11:53 PM
254

Yes. Yes I have. Do you consider George Washington to be a religious figure?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 11:54 PM
255

No. His work holds religious-like characteristics. Buddhists, Catholics, Hindus, Muslims Ė all claim him as their own, but no, ultimately his agenda is not religious.

Posted by Cynthia Brown | September 18, 2008 11:55 PM
256

Can you describe your personal contact with him?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 11:56 PM
257

Itís very limited. Of course I tried many times, but after Frank and Mimiís murder in Rome, he was very well protected. It was nearly impossible to get close to him. But there were a handful of times, most very brief. The only significant exposure I had to George was in 1997. He was twenty-one years old. I knew him through his work, just like everyone else.

Posted by Cynthia Brown | September 18, 2008 11:56 PM
258

Could you describe his physical features, if we were to bring in a portrait artist?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 11:57 PM
259

(Pause)

No. I only saw him in silhouette. It was a safety precaution.

Posted by Cynthia Brown | September 18, 2008 11:57 PM
260

I see. Could you please describe the circumstances of your encounter?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 11:58 PM
261

I was then working as an associate curator at the Getty. This was during the transition. We were preparing to leave the Malibu location, before our new site opened. There was a lot of talk about George painting a mural for the new museum, it would have been a major victory for the Getty.

Posted by Cynthia Brown | September 18, 2008 11:58 PM
262

My records indicate that indeed George did paint a mural for the Getty in 1998. I also understand George didnít paint for money. That he traded for experience. Why?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 18, 2008 11:59 PM
263

From 1979 to 1987, George painted for money- billions of dollars. This is the period when Frank and Mimi Washington managed his career. Before they were murdered. In those seven years, George produced three hundred and seventy six works. At the age of eleven, George had an estimated worth of 17 billion dollars. After Rome, George never painted for money again. Some believe that it was the influence of Earl Yeager, but I believe that George made his own decision. He was cash rich, but deprived of experience. He had a very sheltered childhood. He didnít need money, he needed life experience. What is the saying, ďItís never too late to have a happy childhoodĒ that was George. So any murals he made from that point on, and it should be noted that he focused exclusively on murals after his parentís death, were bartered. The documentation is quite extensive, no matter how private the arrangements were. When I went to proposition George for the Getty mural, I knew he wasnít going to be tempted by cash.

Posted by Cynthia Brown | September 18, 2008 11:59 PM
264

So what is it that you offered?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 19, 2008 12:00 AM
265

I had a list. A plan ĎAí, a plan ĎBí, a plan ĎC.í It took six months to establish a meeting. I was instructed to be at the Los Angeles Greyhound station at 10:00 a.m. dock ďFĒ with my name written on a sign around my neck. A Greyhound bus pulled up and honked. I stepped in. The windows were all painted over. I was the only person on the bus. It drove god knows where, probably in circles, for two hours. When it stopped, the driver dropped me off at an abandoned gas station, somewhere in the desert. I waited. Eventually another bus came. This was an old yellow school bus. It too had its windows blacked out. This is the first time I met Alex Wu. He was driving and escorted me on the bus. There were other people on the bus, important people. It was amazing. You would recognize most of them. Leaders, movie stars, billionaires, all there for the same reasons I was. To barter.

Posted by Cynthia Brown | September 19, 2008 12:00 AM
266

What was your final destination?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 19, 2008 12:01 AM
267

Talisand Air Force Base. Another hour, we were there- at the infamous home of George Washington, a defunct air force base in the middle of nowhere. A gift from the Pentagon. There is no record of Talisand Air Force Base ever existing.

Posted by Cynthia Brown | September 19, 2008 12:02 AM
268

Ms. Brown, may I ask what you offered George?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 19, 2008 12:02 AM
269


I am not privileged to say exactly, Mr. Morrison, I was, and remain a representative of the Getty and was acting on behalf of the foundation. I will say that all of my offers, and they were quite generous, were systematically rejected.

Posted by Cynthia Brown | September 19, 2008 12:03 AM
270

But Mr. Washington did indeed paint a mural for the Getty Museum. In 1998, if I am correct.

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 19, 2008 12:04 AM
271

Yes, we did come to an- arrangement. I just said he rejected the offers that I brought to the table.

Posted by Cynthia Brown | September 19, 2008 12:04 AM
272

Please understand that this interview is held with the strictest of confidence Ms. Brown.

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 19, 2008 12:05 AM
273

(Pointing at the camera)

You are recording this interview Mr. Morrison. Forgive me if I do not fully indulge in the trust and confidence of this city.

Posted by Cynthia Brown | September 19, 2008 12:06 AM
274

And if I turn the camera off?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 19, 2008 12:06 AM
275

I will adamantly deny any version of events that leak from this interview.

Posted by Cynthia Brown | September 19, 2008 12:07 AM
276

Okay. Camera is now off. Let me see. Can we talk about your books on Mr. Washington?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 19, 2008 12:07 AM
277


Yes- please.

Posted by Cynthia Brown | September 19, 2008 12:08 AM
278

I found it odd that in the over 1,700 pages that you have written on Mr. Washington, not once is there an image of his artwork. Why no pictures? Was the publication of his work not permitted?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 19, 2008 12:08 AM
279

No, plenty of people tried to re-produce his work. Photographic technology was driven by the pursuit. Gordon Wood alone spent billions trying to reproduce the visual power of Georges work. But photography, reproductions, to date, do not hold the visual impact of the originals. Not even close. His paintings were alive. I found it to be an insult and misrepresentative to present his work in that way.

Posted by Cynthia Brown | September 19, 2008 12:09 AM
280

But he was a painter. He did use paint? On flat surfaces? Right? They were not living. I guess I donít understand how a painting couldnít be properly photographed. There are coffee table books of Van Goughís work, of DaVinciís, why not Mr. Washington?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 19, 2008 12:09 AM
281

He was better Mr. Morrison. A higher level of painting. How can I explain? How do you photograph an earthquake, or an orgasm? How can you photograph a bomb going off, or a forest fire? You see it, but not the way that it is. Photographing Georgeís work was like photographing a tornado.

Posted by Cynthia Brown | September 19, 2008 12:09 AM
282

I just donít understand, if the paintings were static, why couldnít they be captured on film?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 19, 2008 12:10 AM
283

That is a question that a lot of very smart people have asked, and spent a fortune on. It is a fair question. And the answer is, something about Georgeís work was kinetic. It was experiential. (pause) I published two before and after books relating to his paintings. The first was a book of exhibition spaces where George had murals. One picture was of the room before being opened to the public, the second image was the end of the day. Again, no pictures of the paintings themselves, just the floor. The second book was the same idea but of viewers expressions, showing how they looked before they walked in and how they looked upon viewing his work. That is the closest I could come to showing the significance of his work.

Posted by Cynthia Brown | September 19, 2008 12:10 AM
284

What made Walden Three so different than the other murals?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 19, 2008 12:11 AM
285

There are many things that separate it from the rest of his work. The most prominent difference is the intense focus and clarity of vision. He didnít overload. He gave just enough information to activate the viewer. In that sense, it was his most disciplined work.

Posted by Cynthia Brown | September 19, 2008 12:11 AM
286

That is why people didnít lose control of their bodily functions?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 19, 2008 12:12 AM
287

Exactly. But not because he couldnít have. He wanted to say something very specific at Walden Three, that is what makes it so special. He found his voice.

Posted by Cynthia Brown | September 19, 2008 12:13 AM
288

And what did that voice say?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 19, 2008 12:13 AM
289

That we need to be very careful about technology and the role it plays in our life.

Posted by Cynthia Brown | September 19, 2008 12:14 AM
290

From the reaction, one might say he downright wants an end to technology.

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 19, 2008 12:14 AM
291

No, not at all. He understands that hammers and bowls, airplanes and printing presses- are all forms of technology. And he recognizes that it is in our nature to invent. He just pointed out how we have strayed the course. The revolution is about returning to a healthy place.

Posted by Cynthia Brown | September 19, 2008 12:15 AM
292

The revolution?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 19, 2008 12:16 AM
293

Why yes. The world is changing very fast right now Mr. Morrison. If this is not a revolution, I donít know what is. And it is not the suicides; those are the people who are in the dark, who havenít seen Walden Three. They are the grievers. But those that have seen, that is origin of the revolution.

Posted by Cynthia Brown | September 19, 2008 12:16 AM
294

Thank you Ms. Brown. Is there anything else that makes the Walden Three mural unique from the other murals?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 19, 2008 12:17 AM
295


He knew it was the last mural he would ever paint.

Posted by Cynthia Brown | September 19, 2008 12:18 AM
296

He knew he was going to die?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 19, 2008 12:18 AM
297

Look at a world map. Mark all of Georgeís murals. Separate those commissioned while his parents were alive from the locations that George chose. A pattern emerges. Sure he traded for experience, but there was something else he was doing. He was building a web. He never painted a mural within a thousand miles of each other. He wanted his work to be accessible to the world. Just look at a map of North America. One in Sitka, one in Seattle, one in Los Angeles. Las Vegas, Santa Fe, Denver, Dallas, Mazatlan, one mural each, all strategically placed. It is like this, all over the world. Northern California had been strangely absent of a mural for years. Walden Three was the closing chapter, the piece that connected all of the dots. Imagine Georgeís murals like bulbs on a string of Christmas lights, Walden Three was the last circuit and when it was finished, the whole string lit up. It was the mural that completed the circuit.

Posted by Cynthia Brown | September 19, 2008 12:19 AM
298

Interesting. You said that you feared for Georgeís life the moment you heard he was painting Walden Three.

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 19, 2008 12:19 AM
299

It was a feeling Mr. Morrison, a hunch.

Posted by Cynthia Brown | September 19, 2008 12:20 AM
300

Because of Pattyís death?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 19, 2008 12:20 AM
301

Because of Pattyís death? Yes, in part. Because Gordon Wood finally got what he wanted, and at no small expense. Because George had no other choice. He had to paint Walden Three, he was stalling. Gordon Wood knew it. George had to paint it before he died or could be allowed to die- if you want to look at it like that.

Posted by Cynthia Brown | September 19, 2008 12:21 AM
302

The coronerís office has ruled out suicide as a reasonable cause of death.

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 19, 2008 12:21 AM
303

Please remember that George Washington traded experience for paintings Mr. Morrison. I do qualify death as an experience.

Posted by Cynthia Brown | September 19, 2008 12:22 AM
304

Do you know the terms of contract between Mr. Wood and George?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 19, 2008 12:23 AM
305

No Mr. Morrison I do not. But I do know that George got whatever he wanted. If George died, it is because George wanted to die. You will have to ask Gordon Wood what the trade was, but I doubt he will be honest with you.

Posted by Cynthia Brown | September 19, 2008 12:23 AM
306

Thank you for your insight Ms. Brown. Is there anything else you can add that may assist in this investigation?

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 19, 2008 12:24 AM
307

Have you seen Walden Three yet?

Posted by Cynthia Brown | September 19, 2008 12:25 AM
308

No Ms. Brown I have not.

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 19, 2008 12:25 AM
309

I suggest you do, and soon. And when you are there, take off the sunglasses.

Posted by Cynthia Brown | September 19, 2008 12:26 AM
310

Yes, wellÖ technically, I am blind Ms. Brown.

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 19, 2008 12:26 AM
311

(stunned and embarrassed)

Oh, I am sorry Mr. Morrison, I did not know. Is itÖ

Posted by Cynthia Brown | September 19, 2008 12:27 AM
312

The reason I was assigned this case? Yes I do believe it provides me with some impartiality.

Posted by Paul Morrison | September 19, 2008 12:29 AM
313

Yes, I imagine it does.

Posted by Cynthia Brown | September 19, 2008 12:29 AM
314

**************intermission****************

The world premiere of George Washington has reached its midpoint.

Posted by PDL | September 19, 2008 12:31 AM
315

As it's getting quite late, if council has no further questions, I'm going to call a recess at this time.

Hearing no objections, council for the State may continue your line of questioning with the witness when court reconvenes tomorrow morning at 10:00 a.m.

Dismissed.

Posted by Judge Morrison | September 19, 2008 12:33 AM
316

Bernie, come here and help me move this table.

Posted by Frank Sturgis | September 19, 2008 1:31 AM
317

Keep it down, you idiot. Mmph. Ok, there. Are you sure we weren't seen?

Posted by yelahneb | September 19, 2008 1:33 AM
318

Both of you shut up and plant the bug already. The guard will be back around soon. Get the table back to -

Posted by Bernard Barker | September 19, 2008 1:37 AM
319

What the fuck - the tape on the lock is gone. Frank, did you take off the tape?

Posted by James W. McCord | September 19, 2008 1:40 AM
320

No I didn't take off the goddamn tape! Bernie, are we done here? I swear to god if we -

Posted by Frank Sturgis | September 19, 2008 1:42 AM
321

Fuck. We're fucked!

Posted by James W. McCord | September 19, 2008 1:44 AM
322

Look, fuck it, maybe we just forgot the tape on that one. The plant's done, let's just go.

Posted by Bernard Barker | September 19, 2008 1:47 AM
323

We taped that fucking door. We need to go to Plan B. Fuck!

Posted by James W. McCord | September 19, 2008 1:49 AM
324

You are one paranoid bastard. Fine, Plan B, what the fuck. Initiate! [TURNS INTO LAMP]

Posted by Frank Sturgis | September 19, 2008 1:51 AM
325

[TURNS INTO SHOVEL]

Posted by James W. McCord | September 19, 2008 1:52 AM
326

[TURNS INTO EVERGREEN]

Posted by Bernard Barker | September 19, 2008 1:55 AM
327

H-Hello? Who's there? Show yourself! Oh. I guess it was just... the wind... whoosh...

Posted by Officer Wills | September 19, 2008 2:09 AM
328

H-Hello?

Nobody likes theater except you losers. This isn't theater posting comments on a blog, it's a representation of how completely useless and irrelevant theater is. How about you pick up extra shifts at the restaurant or go back to school to get a useful degree.

Posted by NOBODY LIKES THEATER YOU LOSERS | September 19, 2008 7:45 AM
329

Just kidding! I actually love theater. In fact, I attend every performance I can whilst dressed in gray tights with a red rose in my clenched teeth. Oh the sweet thorns

Posted by NOBODY LIKES THEATER YOU LOSERS | September 19, 2008 8:42 AM
330

What's up with the delay? They were supposed to reconvene at 10am sharp, and it's like 10:30am already. Do I have time to go get a croissant? Man I'm hungry.

Posted by EVERYBODY LIKES THEATER YOU LOSERS | September 19, 2008 10:39 AM
331

hey #328 why dont you go back to mommy and tell her about the mean actors who made you mad hAHA your a loser who trollz in slog PATHETIC! make sure to put it on your resume about everybody you "pwned" here

Posted by REAL MEN LIKE THEATER YOU PUSSY | September 19, 2008 10:47 AM
332

fucking assholes, this shit is sad, try to actually be a little edgy next time. ohh, blog theater! fuck you, you stuffed fucking fruits.

you just spammed the shit out of the one thing i was actually interested in reading, dickhoes. i imagine ol sam makhovech doesn't appreciate it as much as you egomaniacal back-slapping conceited fucks like to tell each other either. go get your own fucking domain name, idiots.

Posted by dudes | September 19, 2008 11:15 AM
333

All rise, the court is now in session. The Honorable Judge Charles Morrison presiding.

Posted by Bailiff Simmons | September 19, 2008 11:26 AM
334

Please be seated.

[BANGS GAVEL]

I apologize for the delay ladies and gentlemen, but I was called away on urgent court business.

Mr. Morrison, does the State wish to continue its line of questioning with the witness from where we left off yesterday?

Posted by Judge Morrison | September 19, 2008 11:28 AM
335

your honor, i'd like to humbly apologize for the disrespectful attitude and foul language i used earlier; it was entirely inappropriate.

i'm currently suffering from an addiction to meth and i'm a diagnosed schizophrenic, which results in periodical episodes of a sort of "idiot tourettes".

i mean, i love games and all, but it makes no sense to switch from love to hate just because i'm not "into" theater. i could just go somewhere else, and save everyone (including myself) the trouble! geez, i'm so embarrassed i didn't think of that before i shot my mouth off like that. now i'll have to stare at my foolish choice, sitting here idly forever, a black spot on a sheet as white as snow, on Slog, and in my sad heart of hearts.

once again, really sorry about that. i'll try to keep it under control as best i can. also: if i may be excused briefly, i'm in need of a diaper change.

Posted by dudes | September 19, 2008 1:12 PM
336

'k, i'm back. what did i miss?

Posted by EVERYBODY LIKES THEATER YOU LOSERS | September 19, 2008 5:01 PM
337

I love the play, it's awesome and gripping and very well written.

Posted by east coaster | September 19, 2008 6:06 PM
338

stimulate your shiat at

filthyrichmond.com

Posted by Joss | September 21, 2008 3:25 PM
339

More please?

Posted by Tanuki | September 21, 2008 11:56 PM
340

i'm sorry to interupt the proceedings of this court but i have a statement to make: you guys ROCK! i love your play :)
please continue.

Posted by Piti | September 23, 2008 11:24 AM
341

I'm on tenterhooks. Please, please continue! You're being noticed and reviewed.

Posted by Snailrind | September 24, 2008 1:27 AM

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