THIS WILL DESTROY YOU: SOMNAMBULIC CINEMA MUSIC

(Barboza) Post-rock is often described as having a certain cinematic quality, which helps explain why somber Texas instrumentalists This Will Destroy You have had songs featured in not just one but two major motion pictures (Moneyball and World War Z—Brad Pitt must be a fan). While the contemplative beauty and ethereal tension of their eponymous full-length debut had an accessibility that provided a seamless integration into Oscar contenders and summer blockbusters, their follow-up album Tunnel Blanket delved into far darker and more abstract territories that Hollywood probably won’t ever touch. That isn’t to say that there was any compromise of quality in Tunnel Blanket’s bleary washes of distortion, but the existentialist dread permeating through their somnambulic drone is better suited for grainy 8mm than IMAX 3D. With Silent Land Time Machine. BRIAN COOK
See event info »

WHITE+ AND CARSICK CARS ARE CHINA'S NEW ROCK VANGUARD

(Chop Suey) Confession: I’m profoundly ignorant of China’s music scene. But if it’s producing bands like Beijing’s Carsick Cars and White+, we all need to start paying closer attention. White+ recorded their 2012 self-titled album in a German studio, and the results are stunning: motorik-inflected rock that would make Can and Neu! proud, inflated with Terry Riley-esque elements of minimal mesmerism. These songs can’t not be amazing live. Carsick Cars’ new album, 3, was produced by the Clean’s Hamish Kilgour and mixed by Sonic Boom, and if you dig the melodious, cutie indie pop of the Sarah Records roster and the soaring, surging shoegaze rock of the Creation label, you will die for Carsick Cars. They replicate those late-’80s/early-’90s sounds with non-ironic verve, and even dabble with kraut-rock, pulling off an excellent “Hallogallo” impression on “The Best VPN So Far.” Chinese rock is relatively young (it arose in the mid ’80s), but if these two groups are representative, maybe it’s poised to become a musical superpower. With Flavors and Black Nite Crash. DAVE SEGAL
See event info »

MOUNT EERIE EXPLORES NEW SONIC TERRAIN

(Heartland) Phil Elverum’s latest Mount Eerie project, Pre-Human Ideas, is yet another example of the Anacortes-born audio auteur’s freeform recording experimentation. Having already explored things like recording in a de-sanctified church and playing black metal with “natural materials,” Elverum redoes old songs (and a few new ones) on his new album, with AutoTune-style computerized vocals over typically deep, almost orchestral instrumentation—quite the feat considering it was recorded entirely on Garageband. It all manages to retain Mount Eerie’s signature force-of-nature-like balance of delicate beauty and imposing power—something that’s even more evident during their dynamic live sets. Cellist and Stranger Genius award winner Lori Goldston and marimba player Erin Jorgensen open. MIKE RAMOS
See event info »

PURLING HISS' NEW "COLLEGE-RADIO AMIABILITY"

(Sunset) Purling Hiss’s 2013 Drag City album, Water on Mars, finds them admitting into their hard-rock domain a more accessible, higher-fidelity’d strain of songwriting, allowing buoyant melodies and sing-along choruses to move to the foreground. Where Raw Power-leaning, barbed-wire guitar tangle and hoarse growls once dominated their sound (hear “Almost Washed My Hair” and “Montaga Mountain” from their 2009 self-titled debut LP for examples), a newfound sense of college-radio-amiability often surfaces, which may disgruntle some of Purling Hiss’s longtime fans. Still, these Philadelphia dudes haven’t totally lost their noise and feedback habits, as tracks like “Lolita” (a dead ringer for Bleach-era Nirvana), “Face Down,” and “Water on Mars” attest. With Scarves and Neighbors. DAVE SEGAL
See event info »