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Thursday, February 6, 2014

Ever Wonder Why Subway Sandwiches Taste Like Yoga Mats?

Posted by on Thu, Feb 6, 2014 at 9:06 AM

Now you know:

A chemical additive found in yoga mats and shoe rubber will no longer be included in Subway’s sandwich bread, the chain announced Thursday. The move comes after a petition started by blogger Vani Hari gained over 50,000 signatures, although a spokesperson for the company maintains that they were already planning on getting rid of it, anyway.

They were planning to get rid of that chemical additive just before—crazy coincidence!—people started finding out about it. Really!

 

Comments (74) RSS

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eastcoastreader 1
I always wonder why crazy stuff like that is put into food in the first place.
Posted by eastcoastreader on February 6, 2014 at 9:20 AM · Report this
rob! 2
Of course, all breads, potato chips, french fries, and other foods also contain acrylamide, a carcinogen and neurotoxin that is a product of the reaction that takes place when the natural amino acids of proteins are subjected to high heat in the presence of sugars.

It's temperature- and time-dependent, though, so unless you like burnt toast or eat french fries every day, you'll probably be all right.
Posted by rob! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QZBdUceCL5U on February 6, 2014 at 9:22 AM · Report this
NotSean 3
For God's sake, it's BREAD. Why would there need to have been any weirdo chemicals within it? Bread is pretty freakin simple, tasty stuff as is. Why did they bother complicating it at all? Hell, it's also 'fresh baked'.. so it doesn't even have a 'shelf life' to preserve.

Next up: Subway will be found injecting a water substitute into their cucumbers. Cause, regular water is just too damn heavy.
Posted by NotSean on February 6, 2014 at 9:23 AM · Report this
Matt from Denver 4
I love happy coincidences.

@ 1, without having read the linked article or done any other research on this particular chemical, I'd say there's a 75% chance it's a preservative and a 25% chance that it somehow affects the bread's texture in a way consumers find pleasing. Chemical additives are almost always about achieving one or the other.
Posted by Matt from Denver on February 6, 2014 at 9:23 AM · Report this
Matt from Denver 5
@ 3, they don't produce that dough on site. It's coming from somewhere, probably mixed and frozen weeks before it got to the store.
Posted by Matt from Denver on February 6, 2014 at 9:25 AM · Report this
venomlash 6
You talk about it as if it's a scary toxin or something. It's actually a dough conditioner that is fairly safe. Why is it being removed? Because it's been implicated in people's airways being sensitized to the point where some people get asthma.
Posted by venomlash on February 6, 2014 at 9:25 AM · Report this
7
@2 but I love burnt toast. My dad loves burnt popcorn and burns it on purpose. I'm not that bad and I can't stomach the smell of burnt popcorn having grown up in a house that featured that aroma on a near nightly basis. My blackened toast with a little butter...mmmmm
Posted by Incompossible on February 6, 2014 at 9:26 AM · Report this
8
@: It's fairly safe, it only gives people asthma. Asthma = totes safe.
Posted by treehugger on February 6, 2014 at 9:26 AM · Report this
9
You know, maybe we could actually see what this additive actually is and what is known about it, rather than scaring people because it's used in both food and non-food applications or has a scary sounding chemical name.
Posted by Solk512 on February 6, 2014 at 9:27 AM · Report this
10
@8 It's only sensitive to folks with Asthma if they INHALE IT. If it's already in the bread, it's undergone several chemical reactions.

Why did you leave that bit out? Don't you think that's important?
Posted by Solk512 on February 6, 2014 at 9:29 AM · Report this
Urgutha Forka 11
@1,

Read Fast Food Nation. Chemicals are in everything. Not just fast food either... almost everything in the grocery store as well.

The only way to mass produce, store, and ship food around the country that will look, feel, and taste the same no matter where you get it is by using chemicals. Regular, unaltered food can't withstand that kind of life.
Posted by Urgutha Forka on February 6, 2014 at 9:32 AM · Report this
Sargon Bighorn 12
It's like those little tubs of paste in elementary school! Soooo Tasty.
Posted by Sargon Bighorn on February 6, 2014 at 9:35 AM · Report this
13
So that's what reeks whenever I walk by a Subway; I've known their bread smelled funny (not in a "hah hah" way, but in a "hurk!" way), and that could explain why. I'm willing to bet that if it's not that, it's some other additive Subway specifically uses in their bread, and it probably does pose a health risk.

Remember microwave popcorn and how that chemical used for the butter flavoring was found to be harmful (I think it was diacetyl)? The mere smell of that stuff always made me want to hurl, and finally I was vindicated when that news hit.

I have a canary-nose, apparently.
Posted by MemeGene on February 6, 2014 at 9:36 AM · Report this
Pope Peabrain 14
How disgusting! I'm glad I never ate there. Who wants to shit yoga mats?
Posted by Pope Peabrain on February 6, 2014 at 9:36 AM · Report this
15
Next folks are going to be petitioning for the removal of (6aR,10aR)-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol from their baked goods as well. If all chemicals are bad, then this is next, right?
Posted by Solk512 on February 6, 2014 at 9:38 AM · Report this
ScrawnyKayaker 16
Azodiacarbonamide is in a lot of supermarket sandwich bread if you peruse the ingredient list.

I've tried to look up online what it's for, and the easy-to-find answer is "dough conditioner." Supposedly prevents dough from being "overworked" during machine mixing.

Posted by ScrawnyKayaker on February 6, 2014 at 9:38 AM · Report this
17
@13 Yes, a chemical that is 45 ppm is the thing that smells in a fast food joint. That makes a whole lot of sense, especially when the chemical isn't even aerosolized.
Posted by Solk512 on February 6, 2014 at 9:46 AM · Report this
18
@ 14 - I want to shit yoga mats! I could make a fortune real easy in places with a high contingent of neo-hippies, new-agers and the likes.
Posted by Ricardo on February 6, 2014 at 9:48 AM · Report this
19
@16 It's also a flour bleaching agent and increases the speed of proofing.
Posted by Solk512 on February 6, 2014 at 9:48 AM · Report this
20
I can't believe all the fucking idiots who think bread is the same as a yoga mat because they share one ingredient.

I guess beer is now the same as concrete because they both contain the chemical additive "Hydrogen dioxide". Eww, gross, who's going to start that petition?
Posted by Solk512 on February 6, 2014 at 9:54 AM · Report this
Matt from Denver 21
@ 19, "proofing"? Proofing is already fast - take warm water, add yeast, and in five minutes it's proofed. And if one teaspoon from an industrial-sized bag is good, so's the whole bag. (And that's if they're using dry-active yeast. Instant yeast, which I think is more likely to be used on that scale, requires no proofing.)

Maybe you meant rising?
Posted by Matt from Denver on February 6, 2014 at 9:56 AM · Report this
22
I hear they're even adding dihydrogen monoxide to the soda machines now.
Posted by GermanSausage on February 6, 2014 at 10:05 AM · Report this
23
@20 I meant Dihydrogen monoxide
Posted by Solk512 on February 6, 2014 at 10:06 AM · Report this
24
@21 Shit, yes, thanks for the clarification.
Posted by Solk512 on February 6, 2014 at 10:07 AM · Report this
25
Solks512 and his ilk like to deride people for not trusting industry and regulators to do the right thing, but trusting people who repeatedly betray our trust is one definition of insanity. Latest high profile example: Atrazine
http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2014/…
Posted by anon1256 on February 6, 2014 at 10:07 AM · Report this
26
@25, I like to deride people for being scientifically illiterate and afraid of things simply because they don't understand them.

Shit's fun.
Posted by GermanSausage on February 6, 2014 at 10:13 AM · Report this
Pope Peabrain 27
@18 You have a very odd view of yoga and people in general. If it's categories you like, I'd guess you're old.
Posted by Pope Peabrain on February 6, 2014 at 10:13 AM · Report this
guerre 28
Azodicarbonamide is only harmful when respirated, as other commentors have noted. A consumer should never theoretically consume the stuff, as it breaks down readily upon heating to biurea, which your body is exceptionally good at removing. Why is this still a good thing in my book? Now the bakers/factory workers mixing and making the dry flour and the dough will suffer lower rates of asthma. Leave it to america to help workers only when there is a perceived threat to consumers.
Posted by guerre on February 6, 2014 at 10:19 AM · Report this
Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn 29
Everyone knows yoga is super good for you. It's fine.
Posted by Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn http://youtu.be/zu-akdyxpUc on February 6, 2014 at 10:22 AM · Report this
30
@26 Bullshit. Not everyone can be scientifically literate enough to always assess risk and there is a mountain of evidence telling people to be afraid of what goes on in boardrooms. Ignoring it doesn't improve your overall credibility.
Posted by anon1256 on February 6, 2014 at 10:24 AM · Report this
MacCrocodile 31
Ah christ, the "gym mat chemical" bullshit again.

Because without that chemical, gym mats are safe to eat. And it's that chemical that makes gym mats taste bad, too.
Posted by MacCrocodile http://maccrocodile.com/ on February 6, 2014 at 10:25 AM · Report this
32
@19 @21 Proofing is rising; usually the final rise before baking. That's why the baskets you form the loaves in are called "proofing baskets".
Posted by E_Mur on February 6, 2014 at 10:26 AM · Report this
33
@25 Don't you dare put words in my mouth.

I said we should look at the chemical in question and determine the safety of that, not freak the fuck out only because it's used in the production of food and non-food items. I'm sorry if nuance is difficult for you, I just hope your project to get the water removed from beer because it's also used in concrete goes well for you.

Stop acting like a dishonest piece of shit, everyone can read what I've written here.
Posted by Solk512 on February 6, 2014 at 10:28 AM · Report this
34
@28 This is actually a real, legitimate reason for avoiding the use of this chemical. Gold star to you!

@30 "Gosh golly, I don't know what the fuck is going on, but I'm sure as hell not going to listen to anyone who does!"
Posted by Solk512 on February 6, 2014 at 10:30 AM · Report this
gingersnap 35
@13 diacetyl is a naturally occurring chemical - it is a byproduct of yeast during fermentation. Ever wonder why you get a beer that smells/tastes buttery? Because the beer wasn't given enough time to rest and let the yeast reabsorb the diacetyl. Don't be too scared of it, but maybe make your popcorn on the stove and put real butter on it.
Posted by gingersnap on February 6, 2014 at 10:31 AM · Report this
Matt from Denver 36
@ 32, thanks for that. As a home cook, I generally encounter "proofing" as described above, while the cook books all talk about "rising" thereafter.

Personally, speeding up proofing/rising is just another reason to avoid mass-market bread and fast food in general. Bread's flavor comes from the acids created by the yeast in a long, slow rise. If you wonder why Wonder Bread doesn't taste like anything, that's why.

If this chemical was safe to eat but exposing the factory workers to the risk of developing asthma, then its removal is still a good thing.
Posted by Matt from Denver on February 6, 2014 at 10:33 AM · Report this
37
@ 27 - I don't have a very odd view of yoga. This was an instance of what is commonly known as sarcasm. I'm surprised you didn't perceive that - I always read your comments (with great pleasure, I must add), and I would have thought that you're cynical enough to get it.

Several friends of mine are into yoga, and it does them a world of good. Strangely enough, though, none of them actually felt the need to buy an "official" yoga mat. They use whatever mat they already had. So I was merely taking the piss of neo-hippies, new agers and such, who, in my personal experience, much like Sunday cyclists, always need the whole, officially-sanctioned kit before they start an activity (and then end up never actually doing that activity).

I hope this settles the matter. And FYI, I'm 48. You can put me in any category you like because of that.
Posted by Ricardo on February 6, 2014 at 10:39 AM · Report this
notaboomer 38
"Gosh golly, I don't know what the fuck is going on, but I'm sure as hell not going to listen to anyone who does!"
Posted by Solk512


assumes facts not in evidence
Posted by notaboomer on February 6, 2014 at 10:40 AM · Report this
39
@35 Natural does not mean safe. Cyanide is natural. Yes, diacetyl can be produced by yeast, and is a common flaw in beer, but the reason its dangerous has to do with how you're exposed, turns out while it might just be an off flavor in beer, in the air it is associated with eye and skin irritation and eventually significant lung disease.
Posted by lone locust on February 6, 2014 at 10:49 AM · Report this
Pope Peabrain 40
@37 Touche'. However, you missed my attempt at sarcasm.
Posted by Pope Peabrain on February 6, 2014 at 10:49 AM · Report this
41
@38 Reading the comment thread was too much for you to handle?
Posted by Solk512 on February 6, 2014 at 10:52 AM · Report this
42
@33 I said you were deriding people who didn't trust industry and regulators, and I still don't believe I put words in your mouth (filled with invective, good show).

@34 - I clearly wouldn't trust people (and their paid-men) who have been repeatedly caught lying for profit.
Posted by anon1256 on February 6, 2014 at 10:53 AM · Report this
guerre 43
@34, Thanks for the back up! @42 Are you referencing me, subway, or the chemical manufacturer? Because I guess I got the chance to be paid to shill to flour manufacturers after college at General Mills but decided a life of making pop tarts and soybean oil wasn't for me.
Posted by guerre on February 6, 2014 at 10:58 AM · Report this
44
@ 40 - I'll put that down to my usual excuse: English is not my language. (What an easy and useful cop-out!)

Posted by Ricardo on February 6, 2014 at 11:03 AM · Report this
45
@42 I'm deriding people who don't trust scientific consensus or basic scientific principles. I think regulators are awesome, their funding is way too low and they don't have enough power. Not trusting industry is also fine!

As I said in my very first post - we should judge the additive based on it's safety, not on the fact that it's used in both food and non-food production or has a scary chemical name. The latter reasoning makes absolutely no sense - we would be removing water from beer because it's also used to make concrete. Don't you agree that it's dumb? Food grade oils are made into diesel, so should we get rid of those as well?

Look, I don't understand why you think I'm against safety or proper regulation. I'm not. I'm just against people being reactionary about things they don't understand, and dismissive of people who do.
Posted by Solk512 on February 6, 2014 at 11:06 AM · Report this
notaboomer 46
@38 Reading the comment thread was too much for you to handle?
Posted by Solk512 on February 6, 2014 at 10:52 AM


reading the thread was precisely why i objected.
Posted by notaboomer on February 6, 2014 at 11:24 AM · Report this
47
@45 The problem is your continued denial that people not in the know have excellent reasons to distrust industry and their scientists, and regulators (the atrazine article linked to @25 is an excellent example of the industry's MO). I can only assess what you write, not what you claim is in you head.
Posted by anon1256 on February 6, 2014 at 11:25 AM · Report this
treacle 48
@3 Were you previously aware that "Wonder Bread" had to change its name to "Wonder Loaf" (thanks to a court case), because it was not actually bread anymore, packed with chemicals as it was that caused it to form the approximate shape & consistency of bread.

YOU NEVER KNOW!
Posted by treacle on February 6, 2014 at 11:27 AM · Report this
seatackled 49
Hey, have you seen what hot-looking people's body parts rub up onto yoga mats? They might have gotten more customers if they'd marketed it correctly.
Posted by seatackled on February 6, 2014 at 11:53 AM · Report this
rob! 50
@7, anecdotes ≠ data of course, but if it makes you feel any better, one of my great-grandmothers ate burnt toast and coffee for breakfast for most of her adult life and lived to the age of 96.
Posted by rob! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QZBdUceCL5U on February 6, 2014 at 11:55 AM · Report this
Nyckname 51
NaHCO₃ is a chemical used in some fire extinguishers and some baked goods. Just sayin'.
Posted by Nyckname on February 6, 2014 at 12:52 PM · Report this
52
"Look, I don't understand why you think I'm against safety or proper regulation."

That's rich coming from someone who wraps himself in the mantle of science to better deny the environmental impact of GM crops, thinks that a Fukushima size disaster is an acceptable risk, and also happens to minimize the energy production potential of renewables.
Posted by anon1256 on February 6, 2014 at 1:03 PM · Report this
keshmeshi 53
I always thought their bread smelled really weird. Don't they have some marketing thing where they talk about how great their bread smells because they bake it in-house? I guess maybe that marketing ploy works on rubes who have never smelled real fresh-baked bread.
Posted by keshmeshi on February 6, 2014 at 1:06 PM · Report this
54

Now we know Jared's secret!

Shoe rubber leading to cancer caused weight loss.

Posted by Supreme Ruler Of The Universe http://_ on February 6, 2014 at 2:25 PM · Report this
55
I feel compelled to switch completely to tortillas only. Is there something in them that is used to kill kittens? If so, keep it to yourself, please. I love Subway's sweet onion sauce chicken sandwich, goddammit. Food snobs and their "oooo I don't want my asthma set off by bread" killjoys. ARRRRGH.
Posted by SubwayIsMyGuiltyPleasure on February 6, 2014 at 3:29 PM · Report this
56
It's a bleaching agent in flour. It might also function as a blowing agent, but it's unlikely due to how much other stuff happens when dough is made.

I work in the industry. We use it to make foam. It heats up, produces gas and creates the foam that makes rubber yoga mars soft, pool tubes float and other such compounds. It doesn't impart elasticity. That's a separate trait, done either by BPA (if you're old school and don't mind leaching out synthetic estrogen) or various acid esters (safer). Elasticity is also a trait of the rubber compounds.

The compounds been already getting phased out piece by piece because the regulatory overhead for the dust exposure risk to workers has made it increasingly disliked. OSHA and the EU equivalent are more impact flu here than anything else.

It was never a threat, never will be a threat, and if you want to really soul your pants about chemicals, you should probably worry more about production sites and pollution from effluent discharge (thermal and chemical pollution) than the compounds those sites are selling.

I can answer more questions on this if you're at all interested. Although admittedly, my expertise is going to be mostly on the industrial side.
Posted by caltrop_head on February 6, 2014 at 3:59 PM · Report this
57
47: The same dopes could extent that to a distrust of all institutions and all experts. Ultimately it's the same dead end that leads to climate change denial and the rejection of evolution, this belief that no experts can be trusted to assess the accuracy or safety of anything. "Oooh The evil white coats are just lying industry shills," etc. At a certain point it becomes the responsibility of the consumer to find credible sources or contact credible sources, instead of becoming crazily paranoid anytime they encounter something alien. Dan's original post is about as worthwhile as Natural News. He shouldn't be using his platform to spread misinformation because he doesn't understand something. He should do some actual research instead of jumping to conclusions like some daytime-TV-watching 1950s housewife.
Posted by Jizzlobber on February 6, 2014 at 4:33 PM · Report this
58
@57 - This state of dysfunction can indeed be used by demagogues to engineer distrust of all scientists and institutions but, there isn't evidence that no expert can be trusted: the evidence points to industry experts. Who are the industry experts in climate science? who are the industry experts pushing evolution? Evidently, it follows from the preceding that not all sciences and scientists are dependent on industry, and some have therefore little to no conflict of interest undermining their credibility.
Posted by anon1256 on February 6, 2014 at 6:10 PM · Report this
59
#57: fair point.
Posted by Jizzlobber on February 6, 2014 at 6:48 PM · Report this
60
Like @13 I always thought subway bread had a bad smell. I wonder if it is related to this chemical additive?
Posted by Pablo Picasso on February 6, 2014 at 7:23 PM · Report this
Q*bert H. Humphrey 61
For God's sake, it's BREAD. Why would there need to have been any weirdo chemicals within it?

Yeah, and I heard some big evil chains use SODIUM HYDROGEN CARBONATE to make muffins! Mucking fuffins! Who needs chemicals for that? BAN SODIUM HYDROGEN CARBONATE AS A FOOD ADDITIVE. They use that shit as a FUCKING PESTICIDE. Oh wait.

Yeah, no, imagine that, some of these things are a little more nuanced. The reason to be grossed out by Subway's bread isn't necessarily because it uses azodicarbonamide, but because it's an industrial-scale product made to be produced as cheapy as possible in a country where chemical safety concerns are more industry-driven than public health-driven. (The issue with asthma for workers handling powdered azodicarbonamide is another issue, though it's not like Subway's dropping azodicarbonamide will save any of the yoga mat makers from asthma.)
Posted by Q*bert H. Humphrey on February 6, 2014 at 8:50 PM · Report this
62
@52: A disaster like Fukushima has happened twice, while coal, oil, and gas just kill thousands a year, and by the way, cause global warming.
Posted by Hanoumatoi on February 6, 2014 at 11:17 PM · Report this
63
@58 I look forward to you petitioning for the removal of water from beer because water is a chemical additive in both beer and concrete.
Posted by Solk512 on February 7, 2014 at 7:28 AM · Report this
64
@62 - "The plague is much better than cholera"

That is twice too many considering the 100s of square miles of land that are now off limits for generations, and you aren't accounting for the impact of uranium mining on local populations or civilian nuclear's evil twin, military nuclear. Nuclear is not needed especially in view of the ~60-year investment cycle of nuclear plants and average 15 year lead time before plants come on line (we don't have that kind of time to act on climate change). Renewables, a smart grid and conservation will provide the energy we need if we ever manage to invest in it rather give the dough to the MIC and fossil fuel sector and nuclear industry, one of the most heavily subsidized technology ever.

@63 - Strawman argument.
Posted by anon1256 on February 7, 2014 at 8:03 AM · Report this
65
@64 You constantly misrepresent the people you quote and you don't argue in good faith. Fuck off.
Posted by Solk512 on February 7, 2014 at 8:39 AM · Report this
66
@65 more unsubstantiated drivel.
Posted by anon1256 on February 7, 2014 at 10:27 AM · Report this
67
@solk512 Dan isn't a research chemist. Neither is my wife. But they and thousands of other Americans are aware that, like the link @25 documents, the ordinary chain of professionals that would normally identify and correct chemical exposures (scientist researches, journalist reports, politician intervenes) has been aggressively tampered with by the companies that profit from these chemicals. So since people know they're being lied to, people pass around scary stories like this to try to stay informed about the dangerous chemicals they know themselves to be inadequately protected from. Agree or disagree? I also think that you could dial down your tone, you come across as spiteful and condescending, which I've seen a lot in these kinds of discussions. Thanks. (Did you read the link @25? Scary stuff, no? I make it a point to know about things like that, and I didn't know that.)
Posted by tejanojim on February 7, 2014 at 10:43 AM · Report this
68
@65 - To be completely clear for the readers who don't know you: your comments are overwhelmingly about disparaging the public for its scientific illiteracy and never about what makes the public not trusting of the regulatory process. This gross imbalance in your point of view combined with your mouthing industry talking points on many environmental issues makes you stand out like a sore thumb if you know what I mean.
Posted by anon1256 on February 7, 2014 at 10:45 AM · Report this
69
@67 I don't expect Dan to be a research chemist. What I do expect Dan to understand is that just because a compound is used in both food and non-food manufacturing doesn't make that compound, absent of any other evidence, a dangerous thing.

That's it. That's all I'm saying. That's why I keep bringing up the example of water in beer and in concrete. I can put water into beer, and water into concrete, and that doesn't make water bad, inedible or dangerous. It means I need to understand what water is before I make a judgement.

If the petition had instead said, "Hey, factory workers are facing increased risks at work for using this stuff", or "Hey, this is untested" or anything of that nature, that's fine. But when people assume every chemical out there is automatically bad and all experts are paid shills and no one bothers to even look up with the actual compound is, we end up with homoepathy, anti-vaxxers and creationists.

Look, five minutes in wikipedia in the references section would have solved this. Instead, if you bring up these issues in a forum like this, people jump on your back, refuse to acknowledge what you've actually said and refuse to engage you honestly. What the hell do you expect my tone to sound like?
Posted by Solk512 on February 7, 2014 at 12:12 PM · Report this
70
@68 Fuck you, I can speak for myself.
Posted by Solk512 on February 7, 2014 at 12:12 PM · Report this
71
69 - "if you bring up these issues in a forum like this, people jump on your back, refuse to acknowledge what you've actually said and refuse to engage you honestly. What the hell do you expect my tone to sound like? "

By the time anyone told you anything in this comment section, you had already posed as a scientific expert, called the public 'fucking idiots' for its lack of scientific literacy and pretended people wanted to ban water so it's rather disingenuous (some call it lying) on your part to pretend that your attitude was motivated by someone commenting on anything you said.
Posted by anon1256 on February 7, 2014 at 2:21 PM · Report this
72
Well, that would explain why I could always smell whether my coworker had eaten lunch at Subway and why my clothing always smelled if he convinced me to come along.
Posted by stanley83 on February 7, 2014 at 6:56 PM · Report this
73
@71 My very first post, at #9:

"You know, maybe we could actually see what this additive actually is and what is known about it, rather than scaring people because it's used in both food and non-food applications or has a scary sounding chemical name."

Don't make shit up, don't add anything, don't ignore anything, just deal with this specific statement in it's whole and complete state. It's not that difficult. Here it is again for you:

"You know, maybe we could actually see what this additive actually is and what is known about it, rather than scaring people because it's used in both food and non-food applications or has a scary sounding chemical name."

This isn't about me, and this isn't about you. Deal with this statement and quit playing games.
Posted by Solk512 on February 8, 2014 at 4:07 PM · Report this
sissoucat 74
It's banned in Europe, of course.
Posted by sissoucat on February 9, 2014 at 11:06 AM · Report this

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