HH-click.jpeg
  • Kelly O

Description: In a city overrun with replicated dive bars, the Crosswalk in Greenwood is refreshingly used and bare and feels like it's been around longer than anyone can remember. Inside the vast space are pool tables, buckets of pull tabs, and old-timey mounted bar stools, while fleck-tile floors and scatterings of cheap furniture recall factory break rooms and even more distant scenes: deep-woods resorts with dusty taxidermy and mesh hats hung from nails in the wall.

What else: A nice selection of convenience food is piled into a cubby behind the bar and illuminated by seedy yellow lights. The collected image of beef jerky, peanuts, trail mix, and potato chips evokes David Adler's Warhol-inspired passage from The Life and Cuisine of Elvis Presley: "Packaged snacks are the universal food of America. They can be purchased virtually anywhere, in all regions, at all times, in the same wrapping, and at nearly the exact same price. They are thus the most democratic of foods, and not just because they are so cheap. Fritos, for instance, whether eaten by Elvis, the president, or a homeless person on the corner, are all exactly the same, crunchy and delicious."

Continue reading »