June 1 will be the 100th anniversary of the opening of Washington's very first world's fair: the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition, which, as HistoryLink puts it, succeeded in convincing a lot of people that Alaska was a suburb of Seattle.

The event was full of marvelous curiosities like the Upside Down House.

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It was also plenty racist. Eskimo and Igorot (Filipino) people were part of the "attractions," on display for the late Victorians to ogle.

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The Igorots were so scantily clad, in fact, that these upstanding Christian men had to be brought in as "moralist" judges. (They ended up OKing the loincloths.)

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HistoryLink's fairly awesome slide show of 58 images from the A-Y-P (where the above images are from) is here.

In remembrance of the way the A-Y-P put indigenous people on display, a group of UW public art students will go on display inside a 20-by-20-foot sculpture on the street for the duration of StreetFair this weekend. Could be interesting.

There's another act of anti-A-Y-P-racism coming up, too—an exhibition of objects by contemporary artists at the Burke called Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition: Indigenous Voices Reply, which opens May 30.

This whole A-Y-P centennial is ramping up: Here's the site for all the related events.