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lwest@thestranger.com

Lindy West was born an unremarkable female baby in Seattle, Washington. She writes about movies, movie stars, exclamation points, lady stuff, large frightening fish, and much, much more. You may have seen her world-famous article “The Different Kinds of People That There Are” or witnessed her single-handedly putting a stop to the Sex and the City movie series (thank god). Lindy’s work has also appeared in GQ, the Daily Telegraph, the Guardian, the New York Daily News, Deadspin, and some other places she can't remember right now.

More Theater Articles by Lindy West

Section

Date

  • Theater

    Sex in Seattle: Episode 13

    Flirting and Pining and Cheating and Swapping
    Posted on 06/08/2006
  • Theater

    On Stage

    This play was weird. The guy with the violin was weird. It wasn't even a real violin.
    Posted on 03/09/2006
  • Theater

    On Stage

    A man, a shark, an aquarium... gay dance party! The gleeful man-on-shark love story, which sets the tone for the rest of Swimming in the Shallows, relies on a sexual perversion only Rick Santorum—or a Dadaist—could think up.
    Posted on 02/16/2006
  • Theater

    Twat and Sweetmeats

    David Mamet's 'Boston Marriage'
    Posted on 02/02/2006
  • Theater

    On Stage

    While Seahawks fans piled into the stadium two miles north, Crispin Spaeth led me through the Crash. Pause. Rewind. exhibit at Western Bridge to a medium-sized room with no windows.
    Posted on 01/26/2006
  • Theater

    On Stage

    Die Fledermaus would be musical comedy if the music were a little worse and the comedy a little better.
    Posted on 01/19/2006
  • Theater

    On Stage

    Lord, spare us from awful art like Global SeXXX-ism: un-wrapped. The baroquely indulgent title is enough to curdle the stomach; the show itself is so bad, it almost defies description.
    Posted on 01/12/2006
  • Theater

    On Stage

    Snowflakes, Sleep, and Stones
    Posted on 12/22/2005
  • Theater

    On Stage

    Googlewhack, Scarlatina, and a Baghdad T&A Cabaret
    Posted on 12/08/2005
  • Theater

    On Stage

    Dina Martina has a long history with The Stranger. This paper has been her staunch booster and its writers have fasted, prayed, and undertaken vision quests to find new
    Posted on 12/01/2005
  • Theater

    On Stage

    Two So-So Plays and One Absolute Stinker
    Posted on 11/10/2005
  • Theater

    On Stage

    Romeo and Juliet is almost a comedy—its wit and ironies would be hilarious if they weren't so deadly. Director John Langs understands this, and gives the play's comedy room to breathe. Dozens of tiny gestures
    Posted on 11/03/2005
  • Theater

    On Stage

    Slavery, Stoicism, and Future-Speak
    Posted on 10/27/2005
  • Theater

    On Stage

    The Haint is a rarity in fringe theater: Subtle, substantial, and unpretentious, it's just a good story told by a great performer. Despite a few technical glitches, creator Troy Mink breezes through the brisk production (at one hour, it's just a little too short) with equal parts Southern snark and grace, animating a whole town's worth of
    Posted on 10/20/2005
  • Theater

    On Stage

    The puppets upstage the plot in Cathay, a trio of stories about Xi'an, China. The first involves an ancient king and his lowborn consort, Lady Yang, whose greedy brother ruins the kingdom. With rebellion among the citizens and barbarians
    Posted on 09/22/2005
  • Theater

    On Stage

    Riff Raff (by Laurence "Morpheus" Fishburne) starts with a bang and ends with a gunshot. Mike (Beethoven Oden) bursts into a dingy, abandoned apartment with three kilos of stolen
    Posted on 09/08/2005
  • Theater

    On Stage

    This production of Tennessee Williams's Mexico drama, which is about God and sex and alcohol and sanity, isn't exactly what you'd expect from the overheated playwright. It lacks atmosphere. And so does Paul Owen's set, which
    Posted on 08/11/2005
  • Theater

    On Stage

    The Violet Hour is a tease of a title, coming from the man who wrote the big gay baseball play Take Me Out. In this newer play, Richard Greenberg isn't trying to make you think lavender: "Violet" really refers to the purple
    Posted on 07/21/2005
  • Theater

    On Stage

    This is that kind of play—twentysomething lads in a thrashed New York apartment that's seen its share of sex, drugs, and records played too loudly at odd hours. The audience files in to watch an actor on the couch, talking to himself in the gray-blue haze
    Posted on 07/07/2005
  • Theater

    On Stage

    Mike Daisey's newest monologue is a mostly lighthearted scrapbook narrative-the classic story of an American abroad, with a soft parody of college theater on the side. By the end of the evening, though, the bumbling thespian routine has split open, revealing a much darker, more interesting core of violence and jealousy.
    Posted on 06/16/2005

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