Friday, April 13, 2012

Apple Says They Were Saving Us From Big, Bad Amazon

Posted by on Fri, Apr 13, 2012 at 2:02 PM

Apple released a statement about the e-book price-fixing suit:

The launch of the iBookstore in 2010 fostered innovation and competition, breaking Amazon's monopolistic grip on the publishing industry. Since then customers have benefited from eBooks that are more interactive and engaging. Just as we've allowed developers to set prices on the App Store, publishers set prices on the iBookstore.

Huh. I guess everyone is the David of their own story, throwing pebbles at Goliaths. But still, this seems as good a place as any to link to John Scalzi's blog post asking bystanders to display a little common sense when talking about this whole e-book lawsuit:

Amazon is not on your side. Neither is Apple, or Barnes & Noble, or Google, or Penguin or Macmillan. These are all corporations, not sports teams, and with the exception of Macmillan, they are publicly owned. They have a fiduciary duty to their shareholders to maximize value. You are the means to that, not the end. The side these companies are on is their own side, and the side of their shareholders. This self-interest doesn’t make them evil. It makes them corporations.

Amazon wants you to stay in their electronic ecosystem for buying ebooks (and music, and movies, and apps and games). So does Apple, Barnes & Noble and Google. None of them are interested in sharing you with anyone else, ever. Publishers, alternately, are interested in having as many online retailers as possible, each doing business with them on terms as advantageous to the publishers as possible. All of them will work for their own ends to achieve their goals. Sometimes, their corporate goals will work in your immediate personal interest. Sometimes they will not.

It's a great bit of perspective, and you should read the whole thing.

 

Comments (10) RSS

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undead ayn rand 1
Fuck all the publishers who raised the prices of their ebooks to prop up their print industry, only to price-fix up the wazoo when courted by Apple.
Posted by undead ayn rand on April 13, 2012 at 2:14 PM · Report this
Will in Seattle 2
Just because you fight Evil doesn't mean you aren't Evil yourself.

Just ask Google.

eBooks should retail for 99 cents - half of the money should go directly to the author.
Posted by Will in Seattle http://www.facebook.com/WillSeattle on April 13, 2012 at 2:18 PM · Report this
3
OMG! Billion dollar companies, any of them, *don't* have my personals best interests in mind? Shocking!
Posted by also on April 13, 2012 at 2:35 PM · Report this
Kinison 4
Yeah its kinda laughable to hear Apple's excuse form its fanboy dept. Its painfully obvious Apple screwed up and should settle like everyone else did.
Posted by Kinison http://www.holgatehawks.com on April 13, 2012 at 2:45 PM · Report this
5

The bottom line is all Portals are Doomed.

Try and do something...one thing really well...like Caine and his Arcade...and succeed on the Web.

Try and do everything and charge a toll, and people will cut around you.
Posted by Supreme Ruler Of The Universe http://_ on April 13, 2012 at 4:22 PM · Report this
6
People are missing the point on this. The Justice Dept. is saying that the publishers colluded with Apple to fix prices. Which is illegal. Three publishers have already settled, so I'm guessing there is some truth to this accusation. It doesn't matter "why" they did it. IT IS ILLEGAL.
Posted by sisyphusgal on April 13, 2012 at 5:00 PM · Report this
Canadian Nurse 7
@2: Editing, typesetting, creating covers. All this should be done just for the love of books?

Posted by Canadian Nurse on April 14, 2012 at 6:14 AM · Report this
Rotten666 8
Whatever. The price of used books online is at an all time low. I win.
Posted by Rotten666 on April 14, 2012 at 6:39 AM · Report this
prompt 9
I'll take my money to the corporations who think that customer satisfaction and not screwing me over are the best way to get my money. Apple makes no qualms about screwing me over when it suits them for the short-term - and so I don't give them my money. There's nothing wrong with wanting to make money, but treating me like I'm a sucker is not going to get my business.
Posted by prompt on April 14, 2012 at 12:57 PM · Report this
Josh Bis 10
Here's a terrible secret: those publishers probably didn't like you sharing their printed books, photocopying their pages, or reselling them to used bookstores either.
Posted by Josh Bis http://www.thestranger.com/seattle/Author.html?oid=3815563 on April 16, 2012 at 9:28 PM · Report this

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