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Monday, December 3, 2007

Association: Part Two

posted by on December 3 at 11:39 AM

The first American project by the London-based architect David Adjaye is this studio in Fort Greene, Brooklyn:

2002341144494830339_rs-1.jpg

The handsome couple below commissioned and own the four-story studio:
2001261002199242047_rs-1.jpg James Casebere and Lorna Simpson are famous photographers.

RSS icon Comments

1

Charles, thanks for this erudite post about architecture in Brooklyn. I moved here from Manhattan and miss it so much! I wish Seattle Architecture could be like Manhattan and Brooklyn. Your slog posts remind readers of what Seattle could become if it weren't a racist, Christian backwater. Happy Hanukkah!

Posted by Issur | December 3, 2007 11:50 AM
2

I like this studio a lot. Thanks for the picture.

Posted by Greg | December 3, 2007 11:54 AM
3

I could, I guess, point out that:

It's a box.

But I won't.

Posted by NapoleonXIV | December 3, 2007 12:33 PM
4

I like it.

Posted by Dougsf | December 3, 2007 12:45 PM
5

Famous photographers huh? Yawn..

Posted by M | December 3, 2007 12:53 PM
6

James Casebere is sexy as fuck.

Posted by Mr. Poe | December 3, 2007 1:30 PM
7

Yes a box. Boring anticeptic, 80's Industriual. Mark Millet of Seattle was doing this in the late 80's and early 90's. The couple looks boring too...

Posted by Ummmm | December 3, 2007 1:37 PM
8

charles, post some pictures of hot east african ladies.

Posted by max solomon | December 3, 2007 2:41 PM
9

This house is in my neighborhood in Bklyn, and when all the other houses are beautiful old brownstones and brick row houses, I think this super-contrasting style is smart. The problem in Seattle to me is that a lot of new architecture attempts to recreate/update/blend in with the classic craftsman styleóbut it will always look cheap next to the originals. If you go in the opposite direction, the contrast is interesting and allows the good points of each to shine. Another good example is Renzo Piano's addition to the Morgan Library in NYCóglass and steel integrated with one of the most classic buildings in the city. Not to drone on...but for Seattle I also think the best way to respect the beauty of the natural environment is not to copy it with decoration, but to go the opposite direction, super modern and clean.

Posted by Strath Shepard | December 3, 2007 4:19 PM
10

@9 Seattle's best architecture is Martin Selig's Columbia Center. I believe Charles loves this building too. It's tall, sleek and black and blocks out Mt.Rainer to remind us all that man must stand against and conquer nature. We need more giant sleek urban buildings in Seattle that make downtown an urban canyon. Then it will be better, more like Manhattan.

Posted by Issur | December 3, 2007 4:29 PM
11

@9 Seattle's best architecture is Martin Selig's Columbia Center. I believe Charles loves this building too. It's tall, sleek and black and blocks out Mt.Rainer to remind us all that man must stand against and conquer nature. We need more giant sleek urban buildings in Seattle that make downtown an urban canyon. Then it will be better, more like Manhattan.

Posted by Issur | December 3, 2007 4:30 PM
12

@10
I'm not hoping for "more like Manhattan," just no more lame townhomes that make weak attempts to echo the classic craftsman style. Blocks and blocks of mediocrity are worse than the jungles of the east, and I would prefer a well-designed urban canyon to sprawl. As things get more dense, I think the best way to do it is to mix super clean and modern with the classic stuff, rather than waffling in the middle.

Posted by Strath | December 3, 2007 5:14 PM
13

"Famous" photographers????

Posted by Hal | December 4, 2007 1:13 AM

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